75th Annual Conference Sessions and Workshops
Friday, March 2 (Details)


Early Bird Open Sessions
Early Bird Colloquies
Anne and Ramon Alonso Presidential Plenary Address
All-Day Course
All-Day Workshops
Morning Open Sessions
Morning Workshops
Lunch-Time Open Session
Afternoon Open Sessions (2:30-4:00 pm)
Afternoon Workshops (2:30-4:00 pm)
Afternoon Open Sessions (4:30-6:00 pm)
Afternoon Workshops (4:30-6:00 pm)
Group Foundation Dance Party

For more information on those presenters who have the CGP credential, please click on their names to view their CGP profiles.

Early Bird Open Sessions
7:15 – 8:15 A.M.

Session 206
Contemporary Group Psychotherapy Research

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Research SIG

Chairs:
Cheri Marmarosh, PhD,
Professor, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Rainer Weber, PhD, Senior Psychologist, University of Cologne, Köln, Germany

This is the Research SIG's annual paper session presenting current research in group psychotherapy.

Sessions also on Friday (7:15-8:15 am) and Saturday (7:45-8:45 am)

Title: Compassion-Focused Group Therapy: A Feasibility Trial
Authors: Cameron Alldredge, BS; Jennifer Jensen, MS; Hal Svien, BS

Title: Development of a Group Leader Instrument Based upon Formal Change Theories and the Situational Leadership Model- First Results
Author: Bernhard Strauss, PhD, Professor, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena, Germany

This is a paper session in which panelists present new, clinically relevant research findings, with time for discussion and questions from the audience.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Summarize current research in group psychotherapy.
2. Integrate current group therapy research into clinical practice.
3. Match current research findings to areas of group practice and interest.
4. Discuss important principles related to developing and conducting effective group therapies.

Session 207   
The Ethical and Clinical Dangers of Multiple Relationships at Group Training Institutes

Presenter:
Robert Pepper, PhD, MSW, CGP, FAGPA,
 Director of Training and Education, Long Island Institute for Mental Health, Rego Park, New York

There are eight hazards of blurred boundaries: 1) Breaches of confidentiality, 2) The double bind, 3) Gaslighting, 4) Dumping, 5) The "Emperor's New Clothes, 6) Over-stimulation, 7) Looping, and 8) Scapegoating. The potential  harm of interpreting as transference and resistance all group members' negative treatment reactions will be addressed.
 
Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. List the eight dangers of blurred boundaries to patient/trainees in analytic group institutes.
2. Differentiate boundary crossings from boundary violations at these organizations.
3. Identify the iatrogenic treatment reactions of blurred boundaries in training organizations in which multiple relationships exist.

Course References:
1. Dorpat, T. (1996). Gaslighting, The Double Whammy, Interrogation and Other Methods of Covert Control in Psychotherapy and Analysis. New Jersey: Jason Aronson.
2. Goffman, E. (1961). Asylums. New York: Anchor Books.
3. Kirsner, D. (2000). Unfree Associations. London: Process Press.
4. Pepper, R.S. (2014). Emotional incest in group psychotherapy--A conspiracy of silence. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
5. Raubolt, R. (Ed.). (2006). Power games: Indoctrination masquerading as training in psychotherapy. New York: Other Press.

Session 208 
Marketing for the Group Therapist: Building Your Social Media Empire (AGPA Leadership Track)

Presented under the auspices of the Affiliate Society Assembly

Presenter:
Marc Azoulay, MA, LPC, LAC, CGP, 
Addictions Counselor, Boulder, Colorado

In this open session, group therapists will learn about how to effectively market their groups, which includes introducing use of an automated system and an introduction to the tools required to implement the system (i.e, crowdfire, hootsuite, and social jukebox). The session will also focus on managing professional intrapersonal dynamics such as fear of visibility, low self-esteem, or feelings of overwhelm which can limit group countertransferential issues and decrease client engagement in the services.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Explain the key concepts of Personality Marketing (e.g., brand development, the marketing funnel, and the cookie trail of engagement) and the clinical applications of initial relationship and trust building.
2. Compare the efficacy of different social media platforms (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn) and the outcome on client response to clinical services.
3. Identify personal barriers to successful marketing such as: fear of visibility, low self-esteem, feelings of overwhelm.
4. Implement three marketing automation tools: hootsuite, crowdfire, and social jukebox.

Course References:
1. Cardone, G. (2012). Sell or be sold: how to get your way in business and in life. Austin, TX: Greenleaf Book Group Press.
2. Gerber, M. E. (2012). The E-myth: why most businesses don't work and what to do about it. New York, NY: HarperCollins.
3. Schafer, J. R., & Karlins, M. (2015). The like switch: an ex-FBI agent's guide to influencing, attracting, and winning people over. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.
4. Vaynerchuk, G. (2011). The thank you economy. New York, NY: Collins Business.
5. Vaynerchuk, G. (2013). Jab, jab, jab, right hook: how to tell your story in a noisy, social world. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

Session 209   
DBT and Modern Group Analysis: An Integrative Lens
 

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Mental Health Agency and Institutional Settings SIG

Presenter:

Claudia Arlo, MSW, LCSW-R, ICADC, CGP, Clinical Supervisor/Adjunct Professor, Mt. Sinai West/Fordham University, New York, New York
 

This session will address the use of aspects of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Modern Group Analysis in an integrative fashion. A brief description of DBT and Group Analysis will be offered to highlight common, complementary aspects and differences. Group discussion drawn from attendees' practice will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

The attendee will be able to: 
1. Discuss the value of integrating theories to group practice.
2. Describe the tenets of DBT and Modern Group Analysis.
3. Describe the set of skills taught in standard DBT.
4. Apply the content discussed to the treatment of pre-oedipal/borderline clients.
5. Discuss how this integration can be utilized in attendees' practice via discussion/consultation.

Course References: 
 
1. Arlo, C. (2017). Group Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Integrative Response to a Clinical Case. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, Routledge. In Press, 67 (Supplement 1).
2. Arlo, C. (2014) “Pay it Forward”: Siblings and Psychotherapy, Group 38:4, pp.349-351, NY.
3. Linehan, M. M. (1993). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for borderline personality disorder. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
4. Lyons, L. (2015). Working with dangerous behaviors: integrating relational psychoanalysis and dialectical behavior therapy with self-injuring patients. In Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy Integration: An evolving synergy. Edited by Bresler, J. & Starr, K. Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.
5. Ormont, L. (1995). A view of the rise of modern group analysis. Modern Psychoanalysis, Vol. XX(1), pp 31-42. 

Session 210   
ADHD Treatment and the Role of Parent Groups

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Psychiatry SIG

Presenter:
Ruth Geller, MD, MEd,
 Attending Psychiatrist, Brooklyn VA Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York

ADHD is an important and sometimes overlooked neuropsychiatric disorder responsive to both pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions.  Group offers a particularly effective venue for serving parents of children with ADHD, and group also serves as an ideal venue for learning and practicing social and executive functioning skills which often challenge people with ADHD. Dr. Geller will present her model of an ADHD Parent Group.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe several effective treatments for ADHD.
2. Identify several important factors to consider when conducting ADHD Parent Group screening interviews.
3. Design effective ADHD Parent Groups.

Course References:
1. Glasser, H. (1998). Transforming the Difficult Child. Tucson, AZ: Nurtured Heart Publications.
2. Dawson, P. (2009). Smart but Scattered. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
3. Barkley, R. (2013). Taking Charge of ADHD. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
4. Hallowell, E. (1994). Driven to Distraction.  New York, NY: Touchstone.
5. Wilens, T. (2016). Straight Talk about Psychiatric Medications for Kids. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Session 211  
Navigating the Risky Business of Assessing Suicide in Therapy Groups

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG

Presenters:
Joeleen Cooper-Bhatia, PhD, Licensed Psychologist/Group Coordinator, Auburn University Student Counseling Services, Auburn, Alabama
Erica Smith, MA, Senior Staff Clinician, Auburn University Counseling Services, Auburn, Alabama


This open session will focus on assisting participants in understanding and discussing issues related to suicide assessment in group and applications for clinical work. Upon completion, participants will obtain practical resources to evaluate the procedures used at their agency/center and establish a clear protocol for addressing suicide in group therapy.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to: 
1. Identify factors that contribute to the complexity of suicide assessment in group.
2. Construct criteria for determining when/how to include suicidal members in group.
3. Evaluate different methods for assessing suicidality when it occurs in group sessions.
4. Apply considerations for suicide assessment in group, both in pre-group screenings and group sessions, to the development of policies and procedures.

Course References:
1. Birky, I. (2013). Group psychotherapy and the tenets of our faith. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 27(4), 273-276.
2. Brunner, J.L., Wallace, D.L., Reymann, L.S., Sellers, J.J., & McCabe, A.G. (2014). College counseling today: Contemporary students and how counseling centers meet their needs. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 28(4), 257-324
3. Denton, L., Gross, J., & Wojcik, C. (2017). Group counseling in the college setting: An international survey of center directors. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67 (4) 1-25.
4. Reetz, D.R., Bershac, C., LeViness, P., & Whitlock, M. (2016). The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) Annual Survey.
5. Whittingham, M. (2013). Group work in college and university counseling centers. In J. DeLucia-Waack & M. Riva. The Handbook of Group Counseling and Psychotherapy (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Sage Books.


Early Morning Colloquies
7:15 8:15 A.M.

Colloquy 3 
Developing the Whole Performer:  A Group Therapy Model for Cultivating Expressiveness, Vulnerability, and Connection

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG

Presenter:
Matthew Tomatz, MA, LPC, LAC, CGP,
 Outreach Services Lead, University of Colorado, Boulder; Counseling and Psychiatric Services, Boulder, Colorado

Being a musician, artist, or performer is a demanding process fraught with inherent challenges. Explore a potent group therapy model for supporting dynamic expression while facing what inhibits excellence. Learn ways to integrate mindfulness practices, performance exercises, and group process to assist clients in achieving peak performance.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1.  Explain how a group process can mirror a performance setting.
2.  Identify factors that inhibit expressiveness and performance ability.
3.  Describe the rational for using mindfulness exercises in working with performers and a method for employing them in a group process.
4.  Articulate one performance exercise helpful to developing peak performance.
5.  Describe how group therapy provides performers experiences of accepting vulnerability as an avenue toward expressiveness.

Course References:
1. Beilock, S. (2010). Choke: What the secrets of the brain reveal about getting it right when you have to. New York: Free Press.
2. Gardner, F. L., & Moore, Z. E. (2007). The psychology of enhancing human performance: The mindfulness-acceptance-commitment (MAC) approach. New York: Springer.
3. Green, B. (2003). The mastery of music: Ten pathways to true artistry. New York: Broadway Books.
4. Kenny, D. T. (2004). A systematic review of treatments for music performance anxiety. Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, 18(3), 183-208.
5. Moore, B. (2010). Playing your best when it counts: Mental skills for musicians. Norman, OK: Moore Performance Consulting.

Colloquy 4
Neural Impacts of Group Psychotherapy: Improving Interpersonal Trust and Guiding Therapists about the Mechanisms of Treatment

Presenters:
Mary Newsome, PhD, 
Associate Professor, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
Wright Williams, PhD, ABBP, CGP, Cinical Psychology, Michael E. DeBakey VAMC, Houston, Texas

This research presentation illustrates the value of using neural data to assess group therapy's impact on Veterans with PTSD. We present research on: a scanner derived measure of interpersonal trust predicting treatment success and showing increased interpersonal trust after treatment; and neural changes in participants in Group-Based Exposure Therapy which may help therapists understand the mechanisms of successful treatment.

Learning Objectives:
The attendees will be able to:
1. Describe problems measuring interpersonal trust in group psychotherapy.
2. Describe two potential ways of measuring interpersonal trust.
3. Specify at least two ways neuroscientists can measure changes after group psychotherapy.
4. Describe how neural and behavioral data reveal a more complete picture of group psychotherapy outcomes.
5. Describe how neuroscientists might enable group therapists to learn more about how their patients change.

Course References:
I. Steenkamp, M.M., Litz, B.T., (2013). Psychotherapy for military-related Posttraumatic stress disorder: Review of the evidence. Clinical Psychology Review, 33, 45-53.
2. Ramage, A.E., Laird, A.R., Eickhoff, S.B., Acheson, A., Peterson, A.L., Williamson, D.E., Telch, M.J., Fox, P.T. A coordinate-based meta-analytic model of trauma processing in posttraurnatic stress disorder. Hum Brain Mapp. 2013 Dec; 34(12):3392-9. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22 155.
3. Brown, V.M., LaBar, K.S., Haswell, C,C,, Gold, A.L., Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Workgroup, McCarthy, G., Morey, R.A. Altered restingstate functional connectivity of basolateral and centromedial amygdala complexes in posttraumatic stress disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2014. 39(2):351-9. doi: 10. 1038npp.20 13.197.
4. Simmons, A..N., Norman, S.B., Spadoni, A.D., & Strigo, I.A., (2013). Neurosubstrates of remission following prolonged exposure therapy in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 82(6), 382-389.
5. Williams, W., Graham, D., McCurry, K., Sanders, A., Eiseman, J., Chu, P., King-Casas, B. (2014) Group Psychotherapy's Impact on Trust in Veterans with PTSD: A Pilot Study. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 335-348.


Anne and Ramon Alonso Presidential Plenary Address
8:30 – 9:45 A.M.

Why AGPA?

Featured Speaker: Barry Helfmann, PsyD, ABPP, CGP, DFAGPA, Managing Partner, Short Hills Associates in Clinical Psychology, Short Hills, New Jersey

This presidential address will cover three main reasons we connect to AGPA: 1) the benefits to us as practitioners, 2) its importance in healthcare, and 3) its importance to our patients. This will cover how group therapy is essential to the national healthcare scene including the economic benefits of prevention rather than reaction. It will explore in depth how our connections to one another through AGPA tremendously benefit our practice and our patients.



 

Two-Day Course
10:00 A.M. – 12:30 P.M. & 2:30 – 5:00 P.M.

(Registration will only be accepted for both days.)

C1. The Warp and the Woof: How Race Roles Influence the Tapestry of our World (Day 2)

Directors:
Philip Horner, LCSW, CGP,
Private Practice, Boulder, Colorado
Rudy Lucas, LCSW, CASAC, SAP,
Private Practice, New York, New York
Christine Schmidt, LCSW, CGP,
Private Practice, Brooklyn, New York
Marcée Turner, PhD, 
Licensed Psychologist, Florida State University Counseling Center, Tallahassee, Florida


Race roles and dynamics influence our personal, professional and community group interactions. This two-day course's interracial leadership will offer participants opportunities to examine internalized racial beliefs in same-race groups AND in cross-racial interactions. Participants will reflect on internalized tensions and take risks to honestly examine their own and others' narratives.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify racialized power dynamics in group process.
2. Define internalized racial oppression, including inferiority and superiority.
3. Define aspects of one's racialized self.
4. State an empathic worldview about one's racialized self and others.
5. Explain the benefits of creating a brave space versus a safe space when learning from different positions of power.
6. Explain how a large group format aids the uncovering of repressed feelings about race.
7. Identify ways to lovingly interrupt racially offensive communications.
8. Explain how White guilt impedes open, honest discussions about racism.

Course References:
 1. Abernethy, A. (1988). Working with Racial Themes in Group Psychotherapy. Group 22(1).
2. Bonilla-Silva, E. (2013). Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America (4th ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.
3. Carter, R. T. (2007). Racism and Psychological and Emotional Injury: Recognizing and Assessing Race-Based Traumatic Stress. The Counseling Psychologist, 35(1), 13-105. http://doi.org/10.117/001000006292033.
4. DiAngelo, R. (2011). White Fragility. International Journal of Critical Pedagogy, 3(3), 54-70.
5. Greene, L., Abramowitx, S., Davidson, C., Edwards, D. (2015). Gender, Race and Referral to Group Psychotherapy: Further Empirical Evidence of Countertransference. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 30(3), pp. 357-364.
6. Helms, J.E. (2008). A Race is a Nice Thing to Have: A Guide to Being a White Person or Understanding the White Persons in Your Life. Hanover, Mass.: Microtraining Associates.
7. Horner, Phillip C., (2012). An exploratory study of White people’s evolving consciousness and how their awareness of White privilege and racism changed their consciousness. Theses, Dissertations, and Projects. Paper 634.
8. Slavson, S. (1956). Racial and Cultural Factors in Group Psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. 6:2, pp. 152-165.
9. Stevens, F., Abernethy, A. (2017). Neuroscience and Racism: The Power of Groups for Overcoming Implicit Bias. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 1 (24), pp. 1-24.
10. Sue, D.W. (2015). Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race (1st ed.). Hoboken: Wiley.


All-Day Course
10:00 A.M.  12:30 P.M. & 2:30 5:00 P.M.

(Registration will only be accepted for both the morning and afternoon sessions.)

C4. Principles of Group Psychotherapy (Part 2)

Presented in cooperation with the International Board for Certification of Group Psychotherapists

Directors:
Joshua M. Gross, PhD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA, Director of Group Services, University Counseling Center at Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
Misha Bogomaz, PsyD, CGP, Clinical Psychologist, University of North Florida Counseling Center, Jacksonville, Florida

Faculty:
Jennifer Alonso, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Tevya Zukor, PhD, CGP
,
Director, University of Mary Washington Talley Center for Counseling Services, Fredericksburg, Virginia

This course provides the experiential component (Part 2) of the Principles of Group Psychotherapy Course. Participants must have completed the Part 1 via teleconference.  The experiential learning is designed to give entry level group therapists a basic understanding of theoretical and procedural structures of the work. When combined with Part 1 (teleconference series), this course will meet the 12-hour didactic requirement for CGP certification and is designed to provide a basic understanding of the theory, principles and application of group work. Please note: Part 1 is a pre-requisite for course attendance.  Participants are expected to bring a copy of Principles of Group Psychotherapy or purchase it at the meeting.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Detect the impact of membership in a group on the understanding of group dynamics.
2. Identify group dynamics, e.g, resistance, scapegoating and sub-group formation, as they arise in the group session.
3. Discuss the creation of norms in therapy groups.
4. Compare the stages of group development.
5. Discuss the role of the leader in relation to the variety of group dynamics.
6. List at least three resources for continuing self-education about group process.

Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association, Inc. (2007). Practice Guidelines for Group Psychotherapy, New York: AGPA.
2. Weber, R. (2006). Principles of Group Psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association Inc.
3. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.
4. Rutan, J.S., & Alonso, A. (1999). Reprise: Some guidelines for group therapists. In J.R. Price, D.R. Hescheles, & A.R. Price (Eds.), A guide to starting psychotherapy groups (pp. 71-79). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
5. Rutan, J.S., Alonso, A., & Groves, J. (1998). Understanding defenses in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 38, 549-472.



All-Day Workshops

10:00 A.M. 12:30 P.M. & 2:30 5:00 P.M.

(Registration will only be accepted for both the morning and afternoon sessions.)

Workshop 37a
Integrating CBT and Experiential Interventions: A New Short Term Group Model

Chairs:
Thomas Treadwell, EdD, TEP, CGP,
Psychologist, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania
Deborah Dartnell, MSOD, MA,
Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Ainsley Stenroos, BA,
Adjunct Professor of Psychology, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania

The Cognitive Group Experiential Therapy (CEGT) model [an action model], incorporates Psychodramatic and Cognitive Behavioral Techniques promoting group interaction(s). The emphasis is identifying negative automatic thoughts, irrational beliefs, core beliefs, schemas, and placing them in action, challenging negative thinking, utilizing Psychodrama Techniques. An emotionally and concrete data based problem-solving process.
 experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe how The Cognitive Experiential Group Therapy (CEGT) model can be used to create a safe and secure environment where individuals can share their dilemma(s) without restraint.
2. Complete and interpret the Automatic Thought Record (ATR).
3. Identify automatic thoughts & focus on 'hot thoughts'. Discuss the meaning of automatic thoughts as they relate to core-beliefs and/or schemas.
4. Explain and implement the major psychodramtic techniques; role-playing, interview in role reversal, protagonist, auxiliary ego, doubling, concretizing and the empty chair techniques.
5.  Explain and implement ‘hot thoughts’ as they relate to schema activation.

Course References:
1. Treadwell, T. Dartnell, D., Stenroos, A. (in press) Integrating CBT & Action Interventions:  A New Short Term Group Model for College Counseling Centers. The Pennsylvania Psychologist. 55, xx-yy.
2.  Dartnell, D., McConatha, J., Kumar, K. & Treadwell, T. (in press) The Mourning After: A Group for Bereaved Caregivers. Journal of the Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society, Group.
3. Treadwell, T., Dartnell, D., Travaglini L., Staats, M., & Devinney, K. (2016). Group therapy workbook: Integrating cognitive behavioral therapy with psychodramatic theory and practice.  Parker, Colorado: Outskirts Press Publishing.
4. Treadwell, T., Dartnell, D. (2017). Cognitive Psychodrama Group Therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. 67, 1-13.
5. Wilson, J. (2012). Dancing in the sun: The creative combination of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and psychodrama. Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal Issue 21. 
6. Baim, C. (2007). A cognitive psychodramtaist: Reflections of the links between cogntive therapy and psychodrama. British Journal of Psychodrama and Sociodrama, 22 (2) 23-31.
7. Fisher, A.(2007).Cognitive alliance: Synergies in cognitive and psychodramatic therapies. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. 1, (4) 237-242.
8. Hamamci, Z. (2006). Inegrating psychodrama and cognitive behavioral therapy to treat moderate depression. The Arts in Psychotherapy. 33,(3),199-207.

Workshop 38a
Enhancing Empathy and Attachment in Process Groups Using Mindfulness and Psychodramatic Techniques

Chairs:
Sue Barnum, MA, TEP, CGP, 
Private Practice, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Jana Rosenbaum, LCSW, CGP, Private Practice, Houston, Texas
 

This workshop will present why psychodrama works, an overview of interpersonal neurobiology, attachment theory, and mindfulness. We will explore the psychodramatic techniques used in process group (doubling, role-taking, role reversal, concretization, and share back), as well as when and when not to use them. We will practice the techniques, then move into process group in the afternoon.  
experiential-didactic-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Review and discuss the scientific bases of psychodrama (attachment theory, mindfulness and interpersonal neurobiology):  why psychodrama works.
2. Demonstrate and practice each of the psychodramatic techniques used in process group (doubling, role-taking, role reversal, concretization and shareback).
3. Discuss appropriate use of psychodramatic techniques in process group.
4. Utilize a mindfulness exercise to begin process group.
5. Integrate one or more of the psychodramatic techniques into their own process group(s).
6. Discuss the efficacy of the use of psychodramatic techniques in process group.

Course References:
1. Hug, E., & Fleury, H. (November 2008). "Moreno's co-unconscious: Contributions from Neuroscience important for individual and group psychology. Psychodrama Classico 10 (1-2), 7-20.
2. Hug, E. (2007). A Neuroscience perspective on psychodrama. Advancing therories in psychodrama. London: Brunner/Routledge.
3. Gantt, S.P., & Badenoch, B. (2013). The interpersonal neurobiology of group psychotherapy and group process. Karnac.
4. Lotze, E. & Barnum, S. (2013). The therapist's creativity handbook: Introducing action and play into process groups. Self-published.
5. Seigel, D.J., (2008). The neurobiology of "we":  how relationships, the mind and the brain interact to shape who we are. Sounds True Audio Learning Course.

Master Workshop 39a
Aging In: Is this the Beginning of the End or the End of the Beginning?

Chair:
Jeffrey Kleinberg, PhD, MPH, CGP, DFAGPA,
 Clinical Assistant Professor, Icahn Medical School at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York

Open to participants with more than ten years of group psychotherapy experience

We get older; group members get older. How does entering the second half of life affect the group process? A group experience, focusing on aging and intended to promote our own resiliency, will lead to a discussion of transference, countertransference and other technical matters that arise in  long-term groups.
 experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify countertransferential and transferential themes that arise from in long-term psychotherapy groups.
2. Describe methods of responding to anxiety and depression that may arise from aging, including facing mortality, dealing with loss, and coping with illness.
3. Delineate methods for strengthening members’ capacity for social engagement, a protective factor related to mental health among an aging population.

Course References:
1. Berk, L., Rafke Hotterbeekx, Jim van Os & Martin van Boxtel (2017). Mindfulness-based stress reduction in middle-aged and older adults with memory complaints: a mixed-methods study. Pages 1-8 | Received 23 Feb 2017, Accepted 15 Jun 2017, Published online: 19 Jul 2017.
2. Forbes, MK, E. Crome, M. Sunderland & V.M. Wuthrich (2016). Perceived needs for mental health care and barriers to treatment across age groups. Pages 1072-1078 | Received 03 Feb 2016, Accepted 15 May 2016, Published online: 03 Jun 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2016.1193121.
3. Karel, M. J., Gatz, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2012). Aging and mental health in the decade ahead: What psychologists need to know. American Psychologist, 67(3), 184-198.
4. Shah, A., Scogin, F., & Floyd, M. (2012). Evidence-based psychological treatments for geriatric depression. In F. Scogin & A. Shah (Eds.), Making evidence-based psychological treatments work with older adults (pp. 87–130). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
5. Stahl, S.T., Scott R., Beach, Donald Musa & Richard Schulz. (2017). Living alone and depression: The modifying role of the perceived neighborhood environment. Aging & Mental Health Vol. 21, Issue 10.

Workshop 40a
Leadership Development: Transferring Group Therapy Skills to Corporate Culture

Chair:
Rick Tivers, LCSW, CGP,
 Private Practice and Adjunct Faculty, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus, Chicago, Illinois

This workshop will involve an Executive Training to help participants transfer their therapeutic skills to the corporate world. Authority, Power and Control from both an internal experience and from organizations  perspective will be examined in the form of parallel process. Interventions, defenses and trainer posture will be addressed.
demonstration-experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Experience components of an Executive Leadership Training.
2. Diagnose defenses in self and corporate culture.
3. Design appropriate interventions using business nonclinical language.
4. Differentiate  between traditional group therapy and group development in business.
5. Work through internal fears of authority, power, and control.
6. Choose best practices in goal attainment.
7. Identify fee structures for experienced trainers/consultants.

Course References:
1. Noe, R. (2012). Employee Training and Development. New York: McGraw Hill.
2. Morrison, T., & Conway, W (2006). Kiss, Bow or Shake Hands, Avon, MA. Adams Media.
3. Craig, R.(1996). The ATC Training and Development Handbook. New York:McGraw Hill.
4. Huges, M , Patterson, L. B. Emotional Intelligence in action. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.
5. Handshaw, Dick, Training That Delivers Results (2014). American Society for Training and Development, American Management Association.


Morning Open Sessions
10:00 A.M. 12:30 P.M.

Session 307
Stumbling into Leadership: The Perils and Privileges…(AGPA Leadership Track)

Presented under the auspices of the Affiliate Societies Assembly

Chair:
Farooq Mohyuddin, MD, CGP, 
Chair of Psychiatry Training and Education, Director Psychiatry Residency, Saint Elizabeths Hospital/DBH, Washington, DC

Presenters:
Maryetta Andrews-Sachs, MA, LICSW, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, Washington, DC
Cheryl Kalter, PhD, CGP, Psychology Consultant, Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital, San Antonio, Texas

Effective Leadership requires a leader to deal with projections, transference/countertransference. Group therapy training enables leaders to understand group dynamics and utilize it the service of the group. Servant Leader, avoiding isolation of the leader, the role of courage and character of leaders will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Evaluate the impact of courage and character on leadership in organizations.
2. Explore their internal road map of leadership.
3. Define servant leadership.
4. Increase awareness of the impact of feedback and on the leader.
5. Differentiate between organizational leadership skills versus therapy group leadership skills.
6.  Utilizing common ground  to avoid isolation of the leader.

Course References:
1. Delong, T.J., & Delong, S. (2011). The Paradox of Excellence. Harvard Business Review, 89(6), 119-23, 139.
2. Forsyth, D.R. (2013). Group Dynamics, 6th Edition. Wadsworth Publishing, 2013.
3. Kanheman, D. (2011). Thinking, Fast and Slow. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
4. Heifetz, R. A. (1994). Leadership without easy answers. Harvard University Press.
5. Maccoby, M. (2015). Strategic Intelligence: Conceptual Tools for Leading Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Session 308
Forming and Maintaining the Modern Analytic Practitioner

Chair:
Elliot Zeisel, PhD, LCSW, CGP, DFAGPA,
 Founder, Faculty, Center for Group Studies, New York, New York

Presenters:
Laura Ebady, PsyD, CGP,
Private Practice, Austin, Texas
Drew Lee, MSW, LCSW, CGP, Associate in Clinical Psychiatric Social Work, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York
Phyllis Rifkin-Russell, LCSW, MS, LMHC, CGP, Board of Directors, AGPA Group Foundation, New York, New York
 

This open session will feature three presenters. Each will speak for 15-20 minutes and describe a current issue they are contending with in their personal and practice life. A large group process that engages the entire audience will follow in an effort to engage the presenters in further discussion.
 

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Explain the importance of ongoing training as clinicians.
2. Differentiate between self and object feelings.
3. Describe the value and importance of studying resistance.

Course References:
1. Altshuler, M. (2000). Using Anger Well: A Constructive Attitude Toward Aggression in a Milieu Setting. Group-Psychotherapy Home-Page, www.group-psychotherapy.com/articles.htm.
2. Black, A. E. (in press). Externalizing the wish for the secure base in the Modern Analytic group. Modern Psychoanalysis.
3. Zeisel, E  (2009). Affect Education and the Development of the Interpersonal Ego in Modern Group Analysis, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59(3).
4. Ormont, L. (1992). The Group Therapy Experience. New York: St. Martin’s Press
5. Furgeri, Lena (editor), The Technique of Group Treatment: The Collected Papers of Louis R. Ormont, Ph.D.

Session 309   
Treating Fragmented Relationships through Group Therapy with Individuals and Couples

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Psychiatry SIG

Chair:
Judith Cochè, PhD, ABPP, CGP, LFAGPA,
Clinical Professor, Perelman Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Presenters:
Yvonne Champion, LCSW, CGP,
Psychotherapist, Champion Counseling, Houston and Springfield, Texas
Juliette Galbraith, MD, CGP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Albert Neeleman, PsyD, Clinical Director, Torneo, Assen, Netherlands

Is anything more devastating than fragmented intimate relationships?  How can clients improve intimate attachments, manage intricate gender issues, resolve marital affairs?  Join us to grapple with challenging clinical and teaching guidelines for group therapy with single and coupled individuals.  Let's address solid clinical guidelines to healing fragmented relationships as we watch the AGPA produced DVD "The Power of Couples Group Therapy/"  Let's become even  more expert in helping clients build joyful intimate relationships.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to: 
1. Identify and take home central clinical techniques in healing fragmented intimate relationships through individual and couples group psychotherapy
2. Expand skills by watching a DVD on couples group therapy followed by town meeting discussion of treatment techniques
3. Identify key concepts taught to psychiatric residents mastering couples and group therapy with individual and couples.
4. Integrate key concepts in healing fragmented intimate relationship from major theorists and clinicians.

Course References:
1. Johnson, S. (2013). Love sense: The revolutionary new science of romantic relationships. New York, NY:  Little Brown
2. Coche, J. (2013). The power of couples group therapy [DVD]. New York, NY: American Group Psychotherapy Association.
3. Coche, J. (2013). Couples group psychotherapy : A quarter of a century retrospective. In  Klineberg, J. (Ed.)  The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of group psychotherapy (pp. 431-456) Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons
4. Perel, E. (2007). Mating in captivity. New York, NY:  Harper Paperbacks.
5. FIsher, H. (2005). Why we love: The nature and chemistry of romantic love. New York, NY: Holt Paperback

Session 310  
Millennials, Gen Xers, and Boomers in Group:  Who Gets Voted Off the Island?

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG; the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Issues SIG; The Internet, Social Media, and Technology SIG; the Issues of Aging SIG; and the Organizational Consulting SIG

Presented in cooperation with University of Houston-Clear Lake Counseling Services

Chair:
Christine Henry, PhD,
Staff Psychologist, University of Houston-Clear Lake, Houston, Texas

Presenters:
Jason Boothe, PhD,
Career Counselor, University of Houston-Clear Lake, Houston, Texas
Charles Crocker, MEd, Director, University of Houston-Clear Lake Career Services, Houston, Texas
Daniel Soltis, MA, Doctoral Student, University of Houston Counseling Psychology, Houston, Texas

When looking at issues of diversity one area often overlooked is generational differences. Silents, Boomers, X, Millennial/Ys, Z/iGens bring their own set of characteristics and values which often clash with the previous generation. The audience will be divided into groups according to their generation and process various issues from that perspective with the whole group. This presentation will examine the definitions of each generation and what challenges and opportunities they have when interacting in group.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to: 
1. List the three current generations in the workforce.
2. Name events that shaped each generation.
3. Define values of each generation.
4. Identify challenges and benefits to millennials in a group with gen-Xers.
5. Identify challenges and benefits to millennials in a group with baby boomers.
6. Identify challenges and benefits to Gen-Xers in a group with baby boomers.
7. List the name and characteristics of the generation after millennials.

Course References:
1. Gupta, P., Bhattacharya, S., Neelam, N., & Kunte M. (2016). Boomers like to confront, generation Y is okay with withdrawal, but they all love to negotiate in India. Conflict resolution quarterly, 33 (94), 403-435.
2. Howe, W. & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising. The next great generation. New York , New York; Vintage Books.
3. Kranzberg, M. B. (2017). Three generations of lesbians: Clinical implications and placement in group. Group, 33 (3), 213-222.
4. Zabel, K. L., Biermeirer-Hanson, B. B. J., Baltes, B. B., Early B. J., Shepard, A. (2016). Generational differences in work ethic: Fact or fiction? Journal of Business Psychology. Advance online publication.
5. Na Ayudhya, U. C. & Smithson, J. (2016). Entitled or misunderstood? Toward the repositioning of the sense of entitlement concept in the generational difference debate. Community, work, & family, 19 (2), 213-226.

 


Morning Workshops
10:00 A.M. 12:30 P.M.

Workshop 41
Theories of Change for the Newly Evolving Group Therapist via Narcissistic Injury and the Use of Countertransference

 
Chairs:
Cindy Aron, MSW, CGP, FAGPA,
 Director of Group Program, Samaritan Health Services, Corvallis, Oregon
 

Sydney Harvey, DO, Psychiatry Resident, Samaritan Health Services, Corvallis, Oregon

Open to participants with less than four years of group psychotherapy experience

The challenges new group therapists face in training and/or as new professionals create a degree of uncharted psychological disorganization that bears attention. The inevitable narcissistic assault on one’s idealized professional self, which is challenged by patients and supervisors, is explored through the use of countertransference. This workshop will teach participants how to utilize this material to further develop and enhance their role as a group therapist and to reorganize their professional self.
didactic-sharing of work experiences-experiential-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1 Appreciate the complexity of the group leader’s role and its interface with the individual’s psyche.
2. Examine the micro and macro narcissistic injury inherent in the group training and
new group professional process.
3. Understand the interventions group therapists take to mitigate the emotional challenges presented by the circumstance.
4. State ways to use countertransference to enhance group process.
5. Appreciate the strength and frailty of our individual psyches as parts of the psychological organization of the developing therapist.

Course References:
1. Brightman, B. (1984). Narcissistic Issues in the Training Experience of the Psychotherapist. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 10, 293-317.
2. Bernak & Epp. (2001). Countertransference in the Development of Graduate Student Counselors: Recommendations for Training. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 26(4). 305-318.
3. Halewood, A. and Tribe, R.(2003). What is the prevalence of narcissistic injury among trainee counseling psychologists? Psychology and Psychotherapy, 76(1) 87-102.
4. Hill, C.E., et al (2007). Becoming Psychotherapists: Experiences of the novice therapists in a beginning graduate class. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice and Training. 44: 434-449.
5. Racker, H. (2007). The Meaning and Uses of Counter Transference. Psychoanalytic Quarterly. 725-776.
6. Rutan & Stone, (2001). Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy, 3rd Ed. New York, London: Guilford Press.

Workshop 42
Unmasking Race and Culture in Group:  Knocking at the Boundaries

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Racial & Ethnic Diversity SIG

Chairs:
M. Sophia Aguirre, PhD, CGP,
Private Practice, Eugene, Oregon
Michelle Ribeiro, EdD, CGP, Psychologist, College Counseling Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
Emi Sumida, PhD, Group Coordinator and Licensed Psychologist, College Counseling Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

This workshop invites a relational study of limiting the silence related to race, culture, and nationalism for the possibility of reparation. Seeking to first hold what is subjective truth in these identities, we will identify socialization processes that lead us either toward certain groups and/or away from others.
didactic-experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify the different racial identity statuses for People of Color and White people.
2. Discuss ways the socialization process connects to attachment with others.
3. Identify ways racial categories help us feel a secure sense of identity and conversely constrict our sense of possibilities with others. 
4. Explore racialized experiences and histories of knocking at the boundaries.

Course References:
1. Carter, N.M. & Perez, E.O. (2016). Race and nation:  How racial hierarchy shapes national attachments. 
 Political Psychology, 37 (4), 497-513. 
2. Harro, B.  (2008). The Cycle of Socialization. In M. Adams, W.J. Blumenfeld, C.R. Castañeda, H.W. Hackman, M.L. & Peters, X. Zúñiga (Eds.). Readings for diversity and social justice (2010) (2nd ed., pp. 45-51) New York:  Routledge Taylor & Francis.
3. Helms, J. (2008). A race is a nice thing to have. Alexandra, VA:  Microtraining Associates.
4. McRae, M. B. (1994).  Interracial group dynamics:  A new perspective. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 19(3), 168-174.
5. Sue, D.W., & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (5th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
6. White, K. (2006). Unmasking race, culture and attachment in the psychoanalytic space: What do you see?  What do we think? What do we feel? London: Karnac Books.

Workshop 43
Using Group to Heal Cognitions, Emotions, and Behaviors about (Real!) Money Issues

Chairs:
Michelle Marie Davenport, MA, LMFT,
 Business Manager, Technology Coordinator, Health & Wellness Counselor, Carden Academy of Maui, Hawaii
Richard Kahler, MSFP, ChFC, Adjunct Faculty, Golden Gate University, San Francisco, California

Experience the transformative power of using real money exercises in group to help clients recognize the underlying emotions and beliefs that drive their financial decisions. Participants are asked to bring an amount of cash (in small bills) that they are willing to lose.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify the nature of money and how it intersects with a clients emotional and mental health.
2. Identify problematic and disordered money behaviors triggered by financial beliefs.
3. Experience how using real money in group exercises can create insight and flexibility around problematic and disordered money beliefs and behaviors.
4. Demonstrate the skillful use of using real money exercises in group.

Course References:
1. Klontz, B., Kahler, R., Klontz, T. (2016). Facillitating Financial Health. Kentucky: NUCO.
2. Klontz, B., Britt, S., Archuleta, K. (2015). Financial Therapy. Switzerland: Springer International.
3. Klontz, B., Britt, S., Mentzer, J., & Klontz, T. (2011). Money beliefs and financial behaviors: Development of the Klontz Money Script Inventory. Journal of Financial Therapy, 2, 122.
4. Gale, J., Goetz, J., & Bermudez, M. (2009). Relational Financial Therapy: The not so surprising relationship of money to relationships. Family Therapy Magazine, September/October, 2529.
5. Klontz, B., Klontz, P., Bivens, A., Wada, J., & Kahler, R. (2008). The Treatment of Disordered Money Behaviors: Results of an Open Clinical Trial. Psychological Services, 5(3), 295308.

Workshop 44
Visible and Invisible Identities in Group

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Racial and Ethnic Diversity SIG, the College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG, the Health and Medical Issues SIG, and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Issues SIG

Chairs:
Eri Suzuki Bentley, PhD, CGP,
Staff Psychologist, Utah State University, Logan, Utah
Leann Terry Diederich, PhD,
Private Practice, State College, Pennsylvania

Groups are impacted by visible and invisible identities of members and leaders. Through experiential activities, participants will explore the roles of assumptions and privilege/oppression in service of building self-awareness and empathic connections. Discussions will include awareness of our own biases and ideas for creating culturally inclusive groups.
experiential-sharing of work experiences-demonstration-didactic

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify one's own visible and invisible identities.
2. Describe risks and vulnerabilities relating to marginalized members' experiences in group.
3. Practice conversations about one’s identity statuses.
4. Plan a specific action for continuing personal/professional growth relating to cultural awareness and practice.

Course References:
1. Barlow, S.H. (2013). Diversities in group specialty practice. In Specialty competencies in group psychology (pp. 208–226). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
2. D'Andrea, M. (2014). Understanding racial/cultural identity development theories to promote effective multicultural group counseling. In J.L. DeLucia-Waack, C.R. Kalodner, & M.T. Riva. Handbook of group counseling and psychotherapy (2nd ed) (pp.196-208). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
3. DeLucia-Waack, J. (2011). Diversity in Groups (pp. 83-101). In R. K. Conyne (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of group counseling. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
4. Hook, J.N., Farrell, J.E., Davis, Don. E.D., DeBlaere, C., Van Tongeren, D.R., & Utsey, S.O. (2016). Cultural humility and racial microaggressions in counseling. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 63(3), 269-277.
5. Tochluk, S. (2010). Witnessing whiteness: The need to talk about race and how to do it. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Workshop 45
Therapists Courageously Confronting their Own Mortality with their Patients

Chair:
Debora Carmichael, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, Cambridge, Massachusetts

How can a therapist make the best use of self when confronted with their own life threatening illness? This workshop will explore the challenges to the treatment and possibilities for growth and deepening connection during one of the most difficult circumstances a therapist can encounter in their life and work. We will explore the role and scope of self disclosure and the particular impact on the transference and countertransference.
demonstration-didactic-experiential-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify at least three ways that denial of their mortality diminishes their clinical work.
2. Identify the risks and benefits of self disclosure when confronting their own life threatening illness.
3. Discern the particular impact their illness has on the transference and countertransference.
4. Practice a range of clinical interventions in order to best navigate the moment of disruption caused by an unforeseen illness in the therapist.
5. Explain the different beneficial components to clinical practice when the therapist is able to confront their own mortality realistically.

Course References:
1. Henry, S. (2010). The therapist's illness as an opportunity in the clinical hour. In V. Mitchell (Ed.), Woman and therapy in the last third of life: The long view (pp. 134-140). New York: Routledge, Taylor & Frances Group.
2. Levin, D. (1998). Unplanned termination: Pain and consequences. Journal of Analytic Social Work, 5(2), 35-46.
3. Monaco, J.L., & Palombo, J. (2012). Reactions of adolescents to their therapist's serious illness. Clinical Social Work Journal, 40(3), 316-325.
4. Morrison, A.P. (1996). Trauma and disruption in the life of the analyst. In B. Gerson (Ed.), The therapist as a person: Life crises, life choices, life experiences and their effects on treatment (pp. 41-54). New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
5. Nields, J. (2013). When the frame shifts: A multilayered perspective on illness in the therapist. In A.J. Adelman. & K.L. Malawista (Eds.), The therapist in mourning: From the faraway nearby (pp.137-157). New York: Columbia University Press.

Workshop 46
Using Rough and Tumble Play in the Adult Group

Chair:
Andrew Eig, PhD, ABPP,
Faculty, Derner Institute for Advanced Psychology, Garden City, New York

Rough and tumble play’s purpose in the adult group is explored through a supervisory experience. This mode of communication involves mild roughhousing in its childhood form and verbal sparring and mild teasing among adults. The multiple uses and neuropsychological benefits for this play style in group and in life will be demonstrated and discussed.
experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Create effective interventions using rough and tumble play.
2. Name at least three developmental benefits of rough and tumble play.
3. Explain the trauma that comes with inappropriate rough and tumble play experiences as a child.

Course References:
1. Eig, A. (2017). Using rough and tumble play in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy.
2. Herzog, J.H. (2001). Father hunger: Explorations with adults and children. London: The Analytic Press.
3. Panskepp, J. and Biven, L. (2012). The Archaeology of mind: Neuroevolutionary origins of human emotions. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.
4. Pellegrini, A.D. (1987). Rough-and-Tumble Play: Developmental and Educational Significance. Educational Psychology, 22 (11): 23–43.
5. Pellis, S. & Pellis, V. (2009). The playful brain: Venturing to the limits of neuroscience. London: Oneworld Publications.

Master Workshop 47
From Psychodynamic Understanding to Existential Understanding

Chairs:
Christen Cummins, LCSW, MSW,
Core Faculty, Antioch University of Los Angeles, Culver City, California
David Hayes, PhD, Psychologist, Louisiana State University, Mental Health Services, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Open to participants with more than ten years of group psychotherapy experience

This workshop will focus on integrating the vertical life (understanding ourselves via our past) with the horizontal life (creating meaningful relationships in the here-and-now). There will be a set of group dyads, a fishbowl group with a discussion/debrief of specific interventions utilized in the existential group process, and a large experiential group process to synthesize ideas and address how this aligns with, enhances, and differs from traditional group psychotherapy.
 experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences-didactic

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Describe the ways in which existential group psychotherapy differs from traditional group work.
2. List the types of clients for whom this approach is and is not suitable.
3. Describe the role choice plays in existential therapy.
4. Summarize at least one intervention specific to existential group psychotherapy.

Course References:
1. Frankl, V. (1967). Psychotherapy and Existentialism. New York: Simon and Schuster.
2. May, R., & Yalom, I. (1995). Existential psychotherapy. In J.C. Corsini, & D. Wedding (Eds.), Current Psychotherapies, 5th Ed. (pp. 262-292). Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock.
3. Oliveira, A., Sousa, D., & Pines, A.P. (2012). Significant Events in Existential Psychotherapy: The Client's Perspective. Existential Analysis, 23(2).
4. Spinelli, E. (2002). The therapeutic relationship as viewed by existential psychotherapy: Re-evaluating the world. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 32(1), 111-118 & 23(2), 288-304.
5. Yalom, I.D. (1980). Existential Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.

Workshop 48
Us versus Them: Group Exploration through Creative Arts

Chairs:
Annie Cree, MA,
Arts Psychotherapist, United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy, London, United Kingdom
Mona Rakhawy, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Through encountering opposites, the power of harmony will be explored. Media, music, painting, body movement will facilitate the group. Participants will be introduced to a holistic perspective exploring biological, cultural and professional oppositions like: right and left hemispheric functions, East and West cultures and polarities that exist in therapeutic practice.
 experiential-sharing of work experiences-demonstration-didactic

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Emphasize the presence of the opposites that exist in the different levels of our existence.
2. Highlight the role of creativity in facilitating the understanding of our dynamics on personal, interpersonal and professional levels.
3.Demonstrate a model of integration and flexibility in group psychotherapy practice.
4. Provide a group experience where we can work on our fixed visions, stereotypes and rigidity.
5. Value the principle of complementarity that ultimately raises professional competency.

Course References:
1. Brown, N.W. (2013). Creative Activities for Group Therapy. New York and London: Routledge.
2. Connor, J.M. & Kilian, D. (2012). Connecting Across Differences (2ns Edition). Finding Common Ground with Anyone, Anywhere, Anytime. PuddleDancer Press, NM.
3. Moon, B.L. (2016). Art-Based Group Therapy: Theory and Practice. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, LTD, Illinois.
4. Riley, S. (2014). Group Process Made Visible: Group Art Therapy, Routeledge, NY.
5. Sonne, M. & Toennesvang, J. (2015). Integrative Gestalt Practice. Transforming our Ways of Working with People. Karnac.

Workshop 49
DBT Skills Training Groups: Blending the Methodology with Storytelling, Spontaneity, and Group Process

Chair:
Elizabeth Olson, PsyD, LCSW, 
Collective for Psychological Wellness, Boulder, Colorado

In this DBT workshop, we will review: Distress Tolerance, Mindfulness, Emotional Regulation, and Interpersonal Effectiveness skills. We will practice mindfulness exercises and discuss skills that promote increased emotional regulation in clients who struggle with affect dysregulation disorders. Storytelling, self-disclosure and group process will be explored as essential components in teaching the skills. Making skills meaningful and giving them context in daily life creates a fun and vibrant environment for clients to learn the skills.
 didactic-experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences
 
Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Identify specific skills to use to teach clients how to regulate themselves when they are distressed.
2. Clearly define and name specific skills in each of the four DBT modules.
3. Practice and teach several mindfulness skills.
4. Describe the neurobiological rationale underlying emotional regulation.
5. Apply the use of storytelling and self-disclosure when teaching the skills.
6. Discuss group dynamics involved in teaching DBT skills.

Course References:
 1. Choi-Kain L.W., Albert E.B., Gunderson J.G. (2016). Evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder: implementation, integration, and stepped care. Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 24(5), 342–356.
2. Linehan M.M., Korslund K.E., Harned M.S., Gallop R.J., Lungu A., Neacsiu A.D., & et al. (2015). Dialectical behavior therapy for high suicide risk in individuals with borderline personality disorder: A randomized clinical trial and component analysis. JAMA Psychiatry, 72(5), 475–482.
3. Bateman A., & Krawitz R. (2016). Borderline personality disorder: An evidence-based guide for generalist mental health professionals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
4. Stoffers J.M., Völlm B.A., Rücker G., Timmer A., Huband N., & Lieb K. (2012). Psychological therapies for people with borderline personality disorder. The Cochrane Library.
5. Krause-Utz, A.,Winter, D., Schriner, F., Chiu, C.D., Lis, S., Spinhoven, P., Bohus, M., Schmahl, C., & Elzinga, B.M. (2017). Reduced amygdala reactivity and impaired working memory during dissociation in borderline personality disorder. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience.

Workshop 50
Psychodrama: The Magic of Growth and Change

 
Chair:
Shelley Korshak, MD, CGP, FAGPA,
 Medical Director and Psychiatrist, Chicago Psychotherapy and Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois

This workshop presents an introduction to the history, theory and technique of psychodrama, and the use of powerful and effective interventions for individual, family, couple, and group psychotherapy. Participants will have the opportunity to experience the magic of growth and change, while gaining training and expertise in basic psychodrama techniques.
 experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Distinguish between using therapy time for reporting of “there-and-then” events, and for showing an experience in the “here-and-now.” 
2. Explain basic psychodrama theory and practice.
3. Explain role play, role training and role reversal, doubling and surplus reality.  
4. Use at least one psychodrama technique as an effective interventions in individual, couple, family and group psychotherapy.
5. Use sharing as a technique for building connection and cohesion in families, couples and groups.

Course References:
1. Carnabucci, K. (2014). Show and tell psychodrama. Racine, WI: Nusanto Publishing.
2. Dayton, T. (2014). Emotional and developmental repair through psychodrama. The Journal of Psychodrama, Sociometry and Group Psychotherapy, 62(1), 9-27.
3. Holmes, P., Farrall, M. & Kirk, K.,Eds. (2014) Empowering practice: Integrating psychodrama with other therapies, Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley.
4. Howie, P.C. (2012). Philosophy of life: J.L. Moreno’s revolutionary philosophical underpinnings of psychodrama and group psychotherapy. Group: The Journal of the Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society, 36(2), 135-146.
5. Korshak, S. (2015). Modified Sociometric Technique Facilitating Group Psychotherapy: Using a Sociogram with Sharing and Reverse Sharing in a Process Group Psychotherapy Session, Journal of Psychodrama, Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy, 63(1), pp. 79-81.

Workshop 51
Together Through Song: The Power of Communal Singing to Create Connection and Elevate Mood

Chair:
Geraldine Alpert, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
 Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of California Medical School, San Francisco, California

This workshop/self study group will explore the evolutionary, sociological and neurobiological impact of communal singing, with particular emphasis on creating feelings of connection and improved mood. Since the experiential component involves communal singing of old familiar songs, some  knowledge of "Oldies-but-Goodies" (camp fire songs, peace songs, folk songs) is recommended.
 experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Explain the evolutionary role of Communal Singing, as a replacement for group grooming in lower primates.
2. Explain changes in the brain that occur during communal singing which effect both mood and the sense of connection.
3. Personally experience the impact of communal singing on group cohesion and mood, and using data from simple objective scales, evaluate the magnitude of this impact, both for themselves and for the group-as-a-whole.
4. Identify Types of groups, clinical populations, and clinical situations  most likely to benefit from adjunctive use of communal singing.

Course References:
1. Mithin S. (2005). The Singing Neanderthals, The Origins of Music, Language, Mind and Body. London Wedenfeld and Nicholson Ltd.
2.  Unwin, M., Kenny, D., & Davis,J. (2002). The effect of Group Singing on mood. Psychology of Music, 30:2 p.175-185.
3.  Insel, T.R. & Young L.J. (2001). The Neurobiology of Attachment. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2, 129-136.
4.  Dunbar, R (1996). The Human Story: A New History of Mankind's Evolution. London: Faber and Faber 2004.
5. Yalom, I. (2005). Group Cohesiveness, in The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York, NY: Basic Books.


Workshop 52

Group Treatment of the Spectrum of Trauma: Disasters to Daily Events

Presented under the auspices of the International Board for Certification of Group Psychotherapists

Chair:
Bonnie Buchele, PhD, CGP, DFAGPA, 
Faculty, Kansas City Psychoanalytic Institute, Kansas City, Missouri

The presenter will define major and developmental trauma and resulting psychopathology with some historical anecdotes. Vulnerability to the impact of trauma will be explicated, conceptualized in terms of attachment history with emphasis on right brain development. Group trauma treatment will be demonstrated in a role play wherein participants are invited to play a "real" patient followed by debriefing as well as a question and answer period.
didactic-experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Identify in psychodynamic terms, the effects of traumatization related to major events such as rape, incest and mass trauma.
2. Identify relational and developmental trauma as well as its expression in the treatment setting.
3. Integrate the treatment of major and stress trauma into general group psychotherapy.

Course References:
1.  Grossmark, R. (2017). Narrating the Unsayable: Enactment, Repair, and Creative Multiplicity in Group Psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67, 27-46.
2.  Buchele, B. (2012). Group Psychotherapy with High-Functioning Adults Like Me.  In J.L. Kleinberg (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Group Psychotherapy, pp. 745-770.  West Susses, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
3.  Schore, A. (2003). Affect Regulation and Disorders of the Self. New York, NY: W.W.Norton and Co.
4.  Wallin, D. (2007). Attachment and Psychotherapy. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
5. Gantt, S. & Badenoch, B. (2013) The Interpersonal Neurobiology of Group Psychotherapy and Group Processes. London: Karnac.

Workshop 53
Filial Therapy Treatment of Children through their Parents in Groups

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Child and Adolescent SIG

Chair:
Michael Andronico, PhD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA,
 Private Practice, Somerset, New Jersey

Participants will have an opportunity to observe or to role play a group of parents learning to conduct individual therapy sessions with their own children. Participants will also learn how to conduct these groups. Applications to couples counseling will also be taught.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences-

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Explain to parents how to conduct play therapy with their children at home.
2. Teach parents how to mirror their children's feelings outside of the sessions when appropriate.
3.Teach parents how to to mirror each other's feelings.
4.Teach therapist to balance dynamic interactions in the parent group with didactic teaching.
5. Apply this to their own feelings.

Course References:
1. Andronico, M. (1983). Filial Therapy. In M. Rosenblum (Ed.), Varieties of short-term therapy groups. New
York:  McGraw-Hill.
2. Bratton, S. (1994). Filial therapy with single parents (Doctoral dissertations, University of North Texas, Denton, (1994). Dissertation Abstracts International,  54(8).
3. Guerney, Jr., B.G. (1964). Filial Therapy: Description and rationale. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 28(4)
303-310.
4. Harris, Z., W Landreth G. (1997). Filial Therapy with incarcerated mothers: A five-week model. International
Journal of Play Therapy
, 6(2), 53-73.
5. Oxman, L. (1971). The effectiveness of filial therapy: A controlled study (Doctoral dissertation, Rutgers
University, New Brunswick. Dissertation Abstracts, International, 32(1), 1B.
 

Workshop 54
Riding the Third Wave: Practical Utilization of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Metaphors and Mindfulness in Group Therapy with Compulsive Clients

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG

Chairs:
Michael Buxton, PhD, 
Associate Clinical Professor, Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
Kristina Hansen, PhD, CGP, Assistant Clinical Professor, Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
Derek Griner, PhD, ABPP, CGP, Associate Clinical Professor, Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah

This Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Mindfulness-based group therapy model is designed to help people with compulsive/addictive habits. Participants will process together ACT metaphors and mindfulness meditations which can be utilized to help group therapy members work through shame, over-control, resistance, emotional avoidance, and work toward values-based behavior.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Recognize how compulsion/addiction problems are related to over-control and experiential and emotional avoidance.
2. Therapeutically help group members work through shame and build early group cohesion.
3. Therapeutically utilize three Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) metaphors which can be used to assist clients to shift from a control & outcome-based change agenda toward an acceptance & process-based orientation to their problems.
4. Therapeutically utilize two brief, guided meditations to facilitate slowing-down and tuning-in to body and mind awareness.
5. Therapeutically utilize two ACT metaphors which can be used to assist clients to defuse repetitive thoughts and emotions associated with sexually compulsive behavior.
6. Therapeutically utilize one ACT metaphor which can be implemented to help clients connect with personal values and feel greater motivation to practice these values in the face of compulsive urges.

Course References:
1. Hayes, S.C., Pistorello, J., & Levin, M.E. (2012). Acceptance and commitment therapy as a unified model of behavior change. The Counseling Psychologist, 40(7), 976-1002.
2. Hayes, S.C., Follette, V.M., & Linehan, M.M. (2004). Mindfulness and acceptance: Expanding the cognitive-behavioral tradition. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
3. Hayes, S.C. & Smith, S.  (2005). Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life: The New Acceptance  and Commitment Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.
4. Hayes, S.C., Strosahl, K.D., and Wilson, K.G. (1999). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Experiential Approach to Behavior Change. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
5. Twohig, M.P.  and Crosby, J.M. (2010). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Treatment for Problematic Internet Pornography Viewing. Behavior Therapy.
6. Twohig, M.P., Hayes, S.C., Plumb, J.C., Pruitt, L.D., Collins, A.B., Hazlett-Stevens, H., & Woidneck, M.R. (2010). A randomized clinical trial of acceptance and commitment therapy versus progressive relaxation training for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78, 705-716.

Workshop 55
How the Group Coordinator Can Foster Group Culture and Innovation in College Counseling Centers and Other Staff Model Clinic Settings

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG

Chairs:
James Bleiberg, PsyD, CGP, 
Associate Professor-Group Coordinator, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania
Joeleen Cooper-Bhatia, PhD, Licensed Psychologist/Group Coordinator, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
Niki Keating, PhD, Group Coordinator/Assistant Director, Counseling and Psychological Services, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York
Noelle Lefforge, PhD, MHA, CGP, Assistant Director, The Practice, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada
Leslie Veach, MS, NCC, LPCS, Group Coordinator and Staff Counselor, Center for Counseling and Student Development, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina

This workshop for group coordinators in a variety of settings focuses on the role of the group coordinator in fostering innovation. Innovation and risk go hand-in-hand. The workshop provides participants with an opportunity to reflect on the risks and opportunities as we build alliances for change within our systems.
sharing of work experiences-didactic-experiential-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. State the role of group coordinator in fostering innovation.
2. Compare and contrast the ways in which group coordinators in other centers foster innovation.
3. Recommend new procedures or modifications of current procedures based on new learnings.

Course References:
l. Birky, I. (2013). Group psychotherapy and the tenets of our faith. Journal of College Student Psychotheropy, 2T(4),273-276.
2. Brunner, J.L., Wallace, D.L., Reymann, L.S., Sellers,I.l., & McCabe, A.G. (2014). College counseling today: Contemporary students and how counseling centers meet their needs. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 2S(4).
3. Denton, L., Gross, J., & Wojcilq C. (2016). Group counseling in the college setting: An international survey of center directors. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, l-2.
4. Reetz, D. R. , Bershad, C., LeViness, P., & Whitlock, M. (2016). The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) Annual Survey. Retrieved from: bltps://wrrw.eulg_sdedaslqts/dsauments./4_ucgcdo42020l6Yo29yonograpn%,2-0:Zq2Qpubliq+.df.
5. Whittingham, M. (2013). Group work in college and university counseling centers. In J. Delucia-Waack., & M. Riva. The Handbook of Group Counseling and Psychotherapy (2nd Edition). Washington DC: Sage Books.

 


Lunch-Time Open Session
1:00 – 2:15 P.M.

LG-2: The Large Group 
Consultants are faculty members of the National Group Psychotherapy Institute of the Washington School of Psychiatry.

Active Consultants: 
Mary Dluhy, MSW, CGP, FAGPA
Ayana Watkins-Northern, PhD
Leon Paparella, MSW, CGP
Robert Schulte, MSW, CGP, FAGPA

Observer Consultants: 
Kavita Avula, PsyD
Reginald Nettles, PhD, CGP

 
The Large Group will be an opportunity to explore unconscious group processes and pursue authentic self expression and constructive communication among members and subgroups. The aim is to better comprehend the motivations, concerns, and aspirations within AGPA, the conference-as-a-whole, and the community of group therapists. Members may deepen their understanding of how sociocultural factors influence all group life, including a psychotherapy group. A consultant team will model a relational approach to conducting the large group.

This session is also offered on Thursday (1:00-2:15 pm) and Saturday (2:00-4:30 pm)
Participants should try to attend all sessions.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Locate and give voice to one's experience within the complexity of the large group.
2. Identify covert and overt barriers to communication.
3. Think and relate as citizen selves with greater capacity for authenticity and mutual regard.
 
Course References:
1. Green, Z. & Steirs, M. (2002). Multiculturalism and group therapy in the United States: A Social constructionist perspective. Group, 4, 233-246.
2. Schneider, S. & Weinberg, H. (Editors). (2003). The Large Group Re-Visited. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers Ltd.
3. Segalla, R. (2014). Relational experiences in large group: A Therapeutic and training challenge. In The One and the Many: Relational Approaches to Group Psychotherapy, p. 242-262. Edited by R. Grossmark and F. Wright. London: Routledge.
4. Sells, Bill. (2005). Mindfulness in the large group. Group, 32, 261-274.
5. Volkan, V. (2014). Psychoanalysis, International Relations, and Diplomacy: A Sourcebook on Large Group Psychology. London: Karnac.



Afternoon Open Sessions
2:30 - 4:00 P.M.

Session 212-5
Manifestation of Bias and Microaggressions in Group Psychotherapy

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Racial and Ethnic Diversity SIG

Chair:
Stephanie McLaughlin, PhD,
 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Presenters:
Claudia Mejia, PsyD, 
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Noelle Lefforge, PhD, MHA, CGP, 
Assistant Professor-in-Residence, The PRACTICE- UNLV, Las Vegas, Nevada
Melissa Goates Jones, PhD, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah

The focus is on bias (implicit and explicit) and microaggressions in group psychotherapy.  Empirical background will be presented. Presenters will provide a framework for how facilitators might recognize and intervene when bias and microaggressions occur in group therapy. The presentation includes a demonstration video (using actors) and time for questions and comments from audience.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe the scientific evidence of bias (explicit and implicit) and microaggressions.
2. Discuss implicit bias in a group format and detect emotional responses that arise during discussion. 
3. Describe how group psychotherapy is a viable option to reduce discriminatory behavior resulting from implicit bias.
4. Evaluate responses to microaggressions along a continuum of harmful to helpful based on the group context.
5. Generate a personal plan for attending to microaggressions in group psychotherapy based on empirical knowledge base and clinical experience.

Course References:
1. Chen, E., Thombs, B., & Costa, C. (2003). Building connection through diversity in group counseling: A dialogical perspective. In D. Pope-Davis, H. Coleman, W. Liu, & R. Toporek, Handbook of multicultural competencies in counseling & psychology (pp. 456-477). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
2. Stevens, F., & Abernethy, A. (2017). Neuroscience and racism: The power of groups for overcoming implicit bias. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 1-25.
3. Sue, D., Capodilupo, C., Torino, G., Bucceri, J., Holder, A., Nadal, K., & Esquilin, M. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for clinical practice. American Psychologist, 62(4), 271-286.
4. Wong, G., Derthick, A., David, E., Saw, A., & Okazaki, S. (2014). The what, the why, and the how: A review of racial microaggressions research in psychology. Race and Social Problems(6), 181-200.
5. Barlow, S., Burlingame, G.M., Greene, LR., Joyce, A., Kaklauskas, F., Kinley, J., & Feirman, D. (2015). Evidence-based practice in group psychotherapy  [American Group Psychotherapy Association Science to Service Task Force web document]. Retrieved from http://www.agpa.org/home/practice-resources/evidence-based-practice-in-group-psychotherapy.

Session 213-5
Training Residents in Affective Attunement and Emotional Process: Four Group Models

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA College Counseling & Other Educational Settings SIG and the AGPA Psychiatry SIG

Chair:
Pamela Menter, MA, ATR, 
Adjunct Faculty, University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii

Presenters:
Chap Attwell, MD, MPH,
Clinical Director of Medical Student Mental Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York
Darryl Pure, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
Lecturer in Clinical Psychiatry, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
William Watson, PhD, CGP, FAPA, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York

The use of experiential groups in the training of mental health professionals can significantly enhance attunement to emotional process in self and others.  We present four models of "affect education" that facilitate trainees’ ability to interact with greater depth and efficacy in their professional work and all life experiences.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe three ways in which experiential groups can enhance psychiatry resident and graduate student training.
2. Name and define three concepts relating to affective process in psychotherapy that are illustrated by training groups.
3. Differentiate options for self-expression within the context of experiential groups.
4. Describe the pros and cons of voluntary vs. required participation in group for therapists-in-training.

Course References:
1. Gans, J.S, Rutan, J.S., & Wilcox, N. (1995). T-groups (Training groups) in psychiatric residency programs: Facts and possible implications. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 45(2), 169-183.
2. Swiller, H. (2011). Process groups. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 61 (2) 263-273.
3. Yalom, I. (1998). The Yalom Reader. New York, NY: Basic Books.
4. Yalom, I. & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, Fifth Edition. New York, NY: Basic Books.
5. Zeisel, E. (2009). Affect education and the development of the interpersonal ego in modern group psychoanalysis. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59(3), 421-32.

Session 214-5
Don't Miss the Moment: Putting Process into the Manualized Treatments of CBT, DBT and ACT with Eating Disorders

Chair:
Jana Rosenbaum, MSW, CGP,
 Private Practice, Houston, Texas

Presenters:
Susan Mengden, PhD, 
Private Practice, San Antonio, Texas
DeLinda Spain, MSW, CGP, Private Practice, Austin, Texas

Evidence-based treatments such as CBT, DBT, and ACT in eating disorder recovery groups are primarily delivered in an educational/instructional format. The integration of the material is not what is ascertained in outcome research. So how does change actually happen? A panel of three eating-disorder specialists discuss the pros and cons of manualized group treatment and demonstrate how to help clients integrate and internalize treatment by adding process to the manualized treatment approach.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Describe the efficacy of evidenced-based manualized treatment in eating disorder recovery groups.
2. Specify the use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), and Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) in eating disorder recovery groups.
3. Describe process in eating disorder group therapy and differentiate this technique from manualized treatment approaches.
4. Demonstrate how to integrate process into manualized treatment in eating disorder recovery groups.
5. Discuss suggestions for future research on eating disorder recovery groups.

Course References:
1. Linehan, Marsha (2014). DBT Skills Training Handouts and Worksheets. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
2. Dimeff, Linda and Koerner, Kelly (2007). Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Clinical Practice: Applications Across Disorders and Settings. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
3. Sandoz, Emily; Wilson, Kelly; and DuFrene, Troy (2011). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Process--Focused Guide to Treating Anorexia and Bulimia. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Press.
4. Dancyger, Ida and Fornari, Victor (2014). Evidence-Based Treatment for Eating Disorders. Haupaug, NY: Nova Science Publishing.
5. Costin, Carolyn and Grabb, Gwen Schubert (2012). 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Co.

Session 215-5
Expanding the Child/Adolescent Group Leader’s Toolbox (Session 1) -- Current Group Approaches in Dealing with Issues of Sexuality and Loss in Groups with Youth

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children & Adolescents SIG

Chairs:
Seth Aronson, PsyD, CGP, FAGPA,
 Director of Training, William Alanson White Institute, New York, New York

Craig Haen, PhD, LCAT, CGP, FAGPA, Adjunct Faculty, New York University, New York, New York

Presenters:
Allison Berwald, LCSW, 
Clinical Coordinator, Hetrick-Martin Institute, New York, New York
Maureen Underwood, LCSW, CGP, Social Worker, Society for the Prevention of Youth Suicide, Freehold, New Jersey

This open session is designed to introduce child/adolescent group therapists to state-of-the-art approaches to expand their clinical skill set and respond to issues that are increasingly prominent in the lives of young people. Participants will learn how to work effectively with bereaved children and adolescents, and LGBTQ adolescents from two leading clinicians working on the front lines with these populations.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Cite three clinical interventions that support the grieving process for young people.
2. Identify three advantages of group work with bereaved children.
3. Name two elements key to leadership of groups for LGBTQ youth.
4. Describe the stages of sexual identity development for adolescents.

Course References:
1. Haen, C., & Aronson, S. (2017). The handbook of child and adolescent group therapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge.
2. Rofofsky, M., Kalyanam, A., Berwald, A., & Krishnakumar, A. (2017). LGBTQ adolescents. In C. Haen & S. Aronson (Eds.), The handbook of child and adolescent group therapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge.
3. Underwood, M., McGuiness, S., & D'Amore, N. (2017). Child and adolescent grief and loss. In Haen and Aronson.
4. Underwood, M., Milani, J., & Spinazzola, N. (2004). The family GOALs project. Verona, NJ: New Jersey Mental Health Association.
5. Wolfenstein, M. (1966). How is mourning possible? Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 21, 91-123.

 
 

Afternoon Workshops
2:30 - 4:00 P.M.

Workshop 56-5
From the Heart of the Dream to the Heart of the Group: An Introduction to Natural Dreamwork

Chair:
W. Keren Vishny, MD, MA, Private Practice, Wilmette, Illinois

Dreams stimulate deep feeling, and enliven the imagination. Natural Dreamwork emphasizes dream experience over interpretation and is well suited to group process. Enactment of dreams enhances insight and interpersonal connection among group members. Participants should be prepared to share and participate in role plays of their own dream material.
experiential-didactic-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. List five defining features of Natural Dreamwork.
2. Identify three therapeutic uses of dreams in group process.
3. Describe the roles of group participants and facilitators in '5 Dimensional' Dream Enactment.

Course References:
1. Kamenetz, Rodger (2007). The History of Last Night’s Dream. New York: Harper Collins.
2. Kamenetz, Rodger (2016). Natural Dreamwork & the Poetic Imagination
http://thenaturaldream.com/natural-dreamwork-the-poetic-imagination/.
3. Lewis, J. and Krippner, S. (2016). Working with Dreams and PTSD Nightmares: 14 Approaches for Psychotherapists and Counselors. Santa Barbara, CA, ABC-CLIO, LLC.
4. McNiff, Shaun (1992). Art as Medicine: Creating a Therapy of the Imagination. Boston & London, Shambhala
5. Neri, C., Pines, M., Friedman, R. (2002). Dreams in Group Psychotherapy: Theory and Technique. London, Jessica Kingsley.
6. Ogden, Pat (2015). Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Trauma and Attachment. New York, W.W. Norton & Company.
7. Sparrow, G.S. (2014). Analyzing chronic dream ego responses in co-creative dream analysis. International Journal of Dream Research, Vol 7, No. 1.

Workshop 57-5
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Group-as-a-Whole

Chair:
Lawrence Malcus, PhD, ABPP, FAGPA, 
Faculty, San Mateo County Residency Training Program, San Mateo, California

A Group Circle “Consultation Please!” letter is used to explore psychodynamic processes and social forces operating at the whole-group level, explicating concepts including role suction, projective identification, scapegoating, countertransference, containment, and the fundamental attribution error.  We consider these in understanding and formulating interventions to address complex whole group dynamics.
didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration-experiential

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Appraise the forces operating within the group that pull the therapist to focus on the individual,  and lose sight of the roles of context and whole-group phenomena in determining members’ behavior.
2. Utilize countertransference to identify projective identifications (individual and collective) and formulate effective group-as-a-whole interventions.
3. Appraise and address potential scapegoating.
4. Apply group-as-a-whole concepts to recognize and address unconscious processes operating at the whole-group level.

Course References:
1. Bion, W. R. (1961). Experiences in Groups. New York: Basic Books.
2. Garland, C. (Ed.) (2010). The groups book: Psychoanalytic group therapy: principles and practice, with the groups manual: a treatment manual, with clinical vignettes. London: Karnac.
3. Horwitz, L. (2014). Listening with the fourth ear: Unconscious dynamics in analytic group psychotherapy   London: Karnac.
4. Knott, H. (2016). Countertransference and projective identification revisited and applied to the practice of group analytic supervision, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 66:3, 323-337.
5. Rutan, J. S. (2014). Things I have learned: 45+ years of group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 64:4, 555-566.
6. Whitaker, D. S. & Lieberman, M. A. (1964). Psychotherapy through the group process. New York: Atherton.

Workshop 58-5
Assessing and Managing Suicide Risk in Group Therapy: Ethical and Clinical Considerations

Chairs:
Erica Lennon, PsyD,
 Assistant Director for Clinical and Outreach Services, UNC Charlotte Counseling Center, Charlotte, North Carolina
Rebecca MacNair-Semands, PhD, CGP, FAGPA, Senior Associate Director, UNC Charlotte Counseling, Charlotte, North Carolina

Meeting the goals of non-suicidal members while attending to emerging suicide risk presents challenges. Strategies for conducting brief risk assessments both during and after group are presented. Considerations include  maintaining group cohesiveness and member involvement, adhering to ethical principles, and including cultural competence. Suggested procedures for agencies are also explored.
sharing of work experiences-experiential-didactic-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify common risk factors for suicide as they relate to ethical principles.
2. Compare options/models for responding to suicidal thoughts within the group related to risk and safety.
3. Identify several methods for including other members while assessing/managing suicide risk.
4. Identify potential policies and procedures within a variety of settings that will promote thorough assessment and management of suicide risk.

Course References:
1. Chu, J. P., Poon, G., Kwok, K. K., Leino, A. E., Goldblum, P., & Bongar, B. (2017). An Assessment of Training in and Practice of Culturally Competent Suicide Assessment. Training and Education in Professional Psychology. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tep0000147.
2. Gottlieb, M. C., Handelsman, M. M., & Knapp, S. (2013). A model for integrated ethics consultation. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 44(5), 307-313.
3. MacNair-Semands, R. R. (2005). Ethics in group psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association.
4. Sommers-Flanagan, J., & Shaw, S. L. (2016). Suicide Risk Assessment: What Psychologists Should Know. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. doi: 10.1037/pro0000106.
5. Wendler, S., Matthews, D., & Morelli, P. (2012). Cultural competence in suicide risk assessment In: The American psychiatric publishing textbook of suicide assessment and management, 2nd ed. Simon, R.I. & Hales, R.E. (Ed). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Workshop 59-5
Group as Microclimate: The Psychodynamics of Climate Change and the Possibility of Group Process as Intervention

Chair:
Benjamin White, LCSW, CGP, 
Psychotherapist in Private Practice, Lafayette, Colorado

"Man is hampered in his meeting of the environmental crisis by a severe and pervasive apathy which is based largely upon feelings and attitudes of which he is unconscious." -Searles

By facilitating stirring encounters with the deepest levels of the unconscious, group process presents the possibility of a powerful intervention for the problem of all time; Anthropogenic Climate Change.
experiential-didactic-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Summarize relevant modern theories of psychodynamics and apply them to human environmental relations.
2. Describe the unconscious dynamics that underlie anthropogenic climate change.
3. Interpret the ways in which groups can be used to elicit these dynamics.
4. Utilize the power of the unconscious to increase efficacy of communication about climate change.
5. Discuss creative new solutions to addressing climate change using psychodynamic theory and group theory.
 
Course References:
1. White, B. (2015). States of emergency: Trauma and climate change. Ecopsychology, 7 (4), 192-197.
2. Lertzman, R. (2015). Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement. Abingdon: Routledge.
3. Orange, D. (2016). Climate Crisis, Psychoanalysis, and Radical Ethics. Abingdon: Routledge.
4. Weintrobe, S.(2012). Engaging With Climate Change: Psychoanalytic and interdisciplinary perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge.
5. Searles, H. (1972). Unconscious process in relation to the environmental crisis. Psychoanalytic Review 59(3): 361-74.

Workshop 60-5
Relationships in Films and in our Groups

Chair:
Sid Siahpush, MD, CGP,
Private Practice, Kirkland, Washington

Films can facilitate change in groups. Both didactic and experiential learning will be provided by assigning the Iranian Academy Award winner movie “A Separation” to be watched before the meeting. Separation is a common issue in the world, nations, groups, families, and even internally especially after the recent political changes.
experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences-didactic

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe how films can be used to facilitate change in groups.
2. Explain how sharing a film viewing experience can affect a group.
3. List types of films likely to facilitate change in groups.

Course References:
1. Bierman, J., Krieger, A., & Leifer, M. (2003). Group Cinematherapy as a Treatment Modality for Adolescent Girls, Residential Treatment for Children & Youth, 21(1), 1-15, DOI: 10.1300/j007v21n01_01.
2. LaMotte, E. (2015). I'm a Therapist. Movies are the Best Tools I Have to Help My Patients. The Washington Post.
3. Rogge, R.D., Cobb, R.J., Lawrence, E., Johnson, M.D., & Bradbury, T.N. (2013, Sep 23). Is Skills Training Necessary for the Primary Prevention of Marital Distress and Dissolution? A 3-Year Experimental Study of Three Interventions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81(6), 949–961, DOI: 10.1037/a0034209.
4. Sharp, C., Smith, J., & Cole, A. (2002). Cinematherapy: Metaphorically Promoting Therapeutic Change, Counseling Psychology Quarterly, 15(3), 269-276, DOI: 10.1080/09515070210140221.
5. Yazici, E., Ulus, F., Selvitop, R., Yazici, A.B., & Aydin, N. (2014, Apr). Use of Movies for Group Therapy of Psychiatric Inpatients: Theory and Practice. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 64(2), 251-270.

Workshop 61-5
Harnessing the Conversation: Understanding Systems-Centered’s Functional Subgrouping as a Communications Pattern

Chairs:
Michelle Lynskey, PhD,
Private Practice, Houston, Texas
Alida Zweidler-McKay, MBA, Private Practice, Lincoln, Massachusetts

Sitting alongside SCT is a research tool, SAVI, developed by Yvonne Agazarian and Anita Simon. Using SAVI, therapists can identify behaviors that inhibit therapy effectiveness and choose interventions to increase potential for change. Participants will use SAVI to analyze Functional Subgrouping and other common communication patterns, and discuss potential interventions.
experiential-didactic-demonstration-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Analyze SCT’s Functional Subgrouping from a communications perspective to understand how and why it works.
2. Describe how therapist language choices impact treatment effectiveness.
3. List two communication behaviors that can interfere with effectiveness of therapist interventions.

Course References:
1. Agazarian, Y.M. (2013). Re-visiting SAVI throery: Patterns, not columns and rows! Systems-centered news, 21 (1), 3-8.
2. Agazarian, Y.M. (2014). Back to Basics. Systems-Centered News, 21(2), 3-6.
3. Benjamin, B., Yeager, A. & Simon, A. (2012). Conversation Transformation. New York: McGraw-Hill.
4. Gantt, S.P. & Agazarian, Y.M. (2017). Systems-Centered Group Therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67 (Sup1), S60-S70.
5. Simon, A. (2014). Red is not the problem. Systems-Centered News, 21(2), 20-22.

Workshop 62-5
The Sound and Color of Silence: A Glance to Silence in Group as a Communication Tool and a Form of Self Exploration

This workshop is open to participants with more than four years of group psychotherapy experience

Chair:
Daniella Bassis, MA
Private Practice, Hofit, Israel

The workshop will integrate theoretical background of expressive therapy and the analytic approach to silence. The group activities will combine the participants' artistic expression of image that present their silence experience. The group will communicate through their images and generate a group artistic creation that will represent their group experience.
experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1.  Analyze the state of silence as a non-verbal form of communication.
2.  Differentiate between the various meanings and roots of silence.
3.  Utilize creative art modalities in groups to facilitate the expression and transformation of unprocessed material.

Course References:
1. Barnes, C. (2015). Speaking with silence. An exploration of silence and its relationship to speech in Analytic Groups. Group analysis, 48,(1): 12-30.
2. Punkanen, M. & Sarrikallio, S. & Luck, G. (2014). Emotion in Motion: Short Term Group Form Dance/Movement Therapy in the Treatment of Depression. The Art in Psychotherapy, 41, 493-497.
3. Regev, D., & Chasday, H.(2016). Silence during Art Therapy- The Client's Perspective. The art in Psychotherapy .PP.2-28 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2016.02.001.
4. Skeffington, P.M., & Broun, M. (2014). Art Therapy, Trauma and Substance Misuse: Using Imagery to Explore a Difficult Past with a Complex Client. International Art Therapy, 19 (3), 114-121.
5. Winnicott, D. (1995) Playing and Reality: Tel Aviv: Am Oved.

Workshop 63-5
Sex, Drugs, and Social Media: Ethically Informed Group Therapy Practice with Adolescents (Part I)

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children and Adolescents SIG

Attendees must attend Workshop 73-5

Chair:
Thomas Hurster, MSS, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA,
Adjunct Professor of Clinical Social Work, Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

This workshop will focus on common clinical challenges and dilemmas encountered in group therapy with teens, viewed through the lens of reflective ethical problem-solving. Difficult behavioral situations frequently encountered in working with troubled youth will be explored through small group problem-solving exercises and a whole group question/discussion period.
didactic-experiential-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Distinguish between ethical principles, professional codes, and state regulations and how they apply to work with adolescents.
2. Discuss the limits of confidentiality in psychotherapy with youth, and the merits of signed informed consent forms with both adolescents and their families.
3. Identify methods of working clinically with difficult and potentially destructive behaviors and decisions of adolescent therapy participants.
4. Recognize the impact of the ever-changing technological world on the clinical realities of working with youth.

Course References:
1. Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated- the social lives of networked teens. New Haven: Yale University Press.
2. Hurster, T. (2016). Ethically informed group practice. In (Haen, C. and Aronson, S. (eds.) Handbook of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy: A Practioner's Reference. New York:  Routledge.
3. James, C., et. al. (2008). Young people, ethics, and the new digital media: A synthesis from the good play project. Online monograph: GoodWork Project Report Series, No. 54, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.
4. MacNair-Semands, R. (2005). Ethics in group psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association.
5. Phelan, J.R. (1974). Parent, teacher, or analyst: the adolescent-group therapist's trilemma. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 24(2), 238-44.

Workshop 64-5
Transgender Identities and Clinical Practice: Updating and Experiencing Clinical Care Models

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Issues SIG

This is a prerequisite for 74-5: Queering Group Therapy: Beyond Homonormative Clinical Care Models

Chair:
Li Brookens, LCSW,
 Private Practice, Boulder, Colorado

Participants will be exploring current mental health practices aligning with optimal health for our transgender clients. After initial teachings on Gender 101 and social/medical transition related resources, attendees will have the option to participate in a gender experiential fish bowl consultation as part of the learning.
experiential-sharing of work experiences-didactic-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify core transgender health needs in mental health and society.
2. Expand core concepts of gender identity and expression beyond binary, essentialist thinking.
3. Differentiate between Gender Dysphoria and Gender Expansiveness.
4. Evaluate the nature of gender identity and expression within clients with regard to tensions between mind, body, and society.
5. Utilize methods of facilitating dialogue with transgender clients.

Course References:
1. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Gender Dysphoria. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.744053.
2. Erensaft, D. (2014). Listening and Learning from Gender-Nonconforming Children. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 68, 28-56.
3. Henig, R.M. (2017). Rethinking Gender. National Geographic, 23(1), 48-72.
4. Saketopoulou, A. (2014). Mouring the Body as Bedrock: Developmental Considerations in Treating Transsexual Patients Analytically. JAPA, 62, 773-806.
5. World Professional Association for Transgender Health. (2011). Standards of Care: For the health of Transsexual, Transgender, Gender Nonconforming People (v. 7). Retrieved from http://www.wpath.org/.

Workshop 65-5
Queering Time and Space: Beyond the Binary of Gender and Sexual Orientation in Group Psychotherapy

Chair:
Carole Clements, MFA, MA,
 Associate Professor of Contemplative Psychology and Dean of Undergraduate Education, Naropa University, Boulder, Colorado

Group psychotherapy has the power to open-up and disrupt hegemonic, binary notions of gender and sexual orientation (e.g., male/female, heterosexual/homosexual). This workshop explores how the concept and practice of queer temporality, a factor in destabilizing heteronormativity, can create gender and sexual inclusion; expand possibilities; and catalyze exploration beyond static identity.
didactic-experiential-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Distinguish among gender, sex, and sexual orientation. 
2. Define heteronormativity and understand how it manifests in group psychotherapy.
3. Define queer temporality.
4. Distinguish among phallocentric, gynocentric, and queer time and space.
5. Apply queer temporality to the practice of group psychotherapy.

Course References:
1. Chodrow, N. (1992). Heterosexuality as a compromise formation: Reflections on the psychoanalytic theory of sexual development. Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought, 15 (3) 267-304.
2. Dinshaw, C., Edelman, L., Ferguson, R. A., Freccero, C., Freeman, E., Halberstam, J., Jagose, A., Nealon, C., & Tan Hoang, N.  (2007, March 30). Theorizing queer temporalities:  A roundtable discussion.  GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 13 (2-3), 177-195.  Retrieved from http://muse.jhu/jppurnals/glq/summary/v013/13.2dinshaw.html.
3. Felski, R. (2000). Cultural front: Doing time: Feminist theory and postmodern culture. New York, NY: New York University Press.
4. Freeman, E. (2010). Queer temporalities, queer histories. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
5. Halberstam, J. (2005). In a queer time and place: Transgender bodies, subcultural lives. New York, NY: New York University Press.
6. Marzullo, M.  (2011). Through a glass darkly: U.S. marriage discourse and neoliberalism. Journal of Homosexuality, 58 (6-7), 758-774.
 

 


Afternoon Open Sessions
4:30 – 6:00 P.M.

Session 216-5
Marginalization: How the Group Experience Can Further Harm Non-Dominant Participants

Chair:
Penelope Asay, PhD,
Associate Professor and University Fellow, Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, Illinois

Presenters:
Mary Clarke, PhD,
The Wright Institute, Berkeley, California
Torrey Wilson, PhD, Associate Professor, Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, Illinois

Members with experiences of oppression--especially people of color--may face further harm within groups while members of dominant groups benefit or "learn from the pain" of their groupmates. Therapeutic harm and cultural oppression in group work and training are addressed. Social justice principles are presented as an ethical imperative.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify theoretical and pedagogical multicultural issues unique to group and understanding group process.
2. Identify common phenomena around diversity for members of nondominant groups.
3. Review their own groups and group leadership from a social justice and multiculturally competent perspective.

Course References:
1. Burnes, T. R. & Ross, K. L. (2010). Applying social justice to oppression and marginalization in group process: Interventions and strategies for group counselors. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 35, 169-176.
2. Debiak, D. (2007). Attending to diversity in group psychotherapy: An ethical imperative. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 57, 1-12.
3. Singh, A. A., Merchant, N., Skudrzyk, B. & Ingene, D. (2012). Association for Specialists in Group Work:  Multicultural and social justice competence principles for group workers. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 37, 312-325.
4. Sue, D. W. (2014). Therapeutic harm and cultural oppression. The Counseling Psychologist, 43, 359-369.
5. Wendt, D. C., Gone, J. P. & Nagata, D. K. (2014). Potentially harmful therapy and multicultural counseling:  Bridging two disciplinary discourses. The Counseling Psychologist, 43, 334-358.

Session 217-5
Core Integrated CBT Skills for Adult ADHD Groups

Chair:
Greg Crosby, MA, LPC, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, Lake Oswego, Oregon

Adult ADHD is not just attention deficit in low interest activities it is also over focusing in high interest activities. This open session will examine core integrative behavioral, cognitive and communication group skills  to better regulate  inattention and over/under focusing and emotional regulation. The presentation will illustrate how one's natural  learning styles that increase attention can be used to shift under focusing to attentiveness. ADHD  will be examined through an integrated CBT and interpersonal neurobiology framework.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. State difference between high interest and low interest activities on brain functioning.
2. Identify core behavioral skills to regulate ADHD.
3. Identify core cognitive skills to regulate ADHD.
4. Identity core communication skills to regulate ADHD.
5. Understand the need to exploring ambivalence toward learning skills.

Course References:
1. Armstrong, Thomas (2010). Neurodiversity. Boston, MA: Da Capo Lifelong Book.
2. Barkley, Russel (2010). Taking charge of adult ADD. New York, NY: Guilford.
3. Brown, Thomas (2013). Attention deficit disorder: The unfocused mind in children and adults. New Haven, CT.: Yale University Press.
4. Crosby, Greg and Lippert, Tonya (2017) Transforming ADHD: Simple, effective  attention & action regulation to help you focus & succeed. Oakland, CA.: New Harbinger Press.
5. Kolberg, Judith and Nadeau, Kathleen (2012). Organize your mind: Organize your life. New York, NY: Psychology Press.

Session 218-5
Expanding the Child/Adolescent Group Leader’s Toolbox (Session 2) - Contemporary Approaches to the Difficult to Reach Child: Autism and Anger Issues

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children and Adolescents SIG

Chair:
Seth Aronson, PsyD, CGP, FAGPA,
Director of Training, William Alanson White Institute, New York, New York
Craig Haen, PhD, LCAT, CGP, FAGPA, Adjunct Faculty, New York University, New York, New York

Presenters:
Kevin Hull, PhD, Hull and Associates, Lakeland, Florida
Qsheqilla Mitchell, PhD, MPH, Center for the Prevention of Youth Behavior Problems, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Child/adolescent clinicians today are called upon to work with a variety of populations in the public and private sectors. In this open session, two renowned clinicians will present models for group work with children with anger management issues and those on the autistic spectrum, offering creative and resilience-based approaches that are applicable to groups with other populations as well.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify two major goals for group work with youth on the autistic spectrum.
2. Describe a model for working with aggressive children.
3. Define peer deviancy training and identify two ways to mitigate its effect with aggressive adolescents through group leader presence and interventions.
4. Describe and apply three integrative play or expressive therapy techniques to their group work.

Course References:
1. Haen, C., & Aronson, S. (2017). The handbook of child and adolescent group therapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge.
2. Hull, K. B. (2017). Children and adolescents with Autism spectrum disorders. In C. Haen & S. Aronson (Eds.), The handbook of child and adolescent group therapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge.
3. Mitchell, Q. P., Lochman, J. E., Boxmeyer, C., Powell, N., Kassing, F., & Jones, S. (2017). Anger and aggression in children and adolescents. In C. Haen & S. Aronson (Eds.), The handbook of child and adolescent group therapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge.
4. Hull, K. (2014). Group therapy techniques with children, adolescents, and adults on the autism spectrum: Growth and connection for all ages. Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson.
5. Lochman, J. E., Dishion, T., Powell, N., Boxmeyer, C., Qu, L., & Sallee, M. (2015). Evidence-based preventive intervention for preadolescent aggressive children: One-year outcomes following randomization to group versus individual therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83, 728-735.

 


Afternoon Workshops
4:30 – 6:00 P.M.

 

Workshop 66-5
Induction or ESP?: Cultivating Intuitive Resources in Group

Chairs:
Michelle Bohls, MA, CGP,
Private Practice, Austin, Texas
William Watson, PhD, CGP, FAPA, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York

We will explore the group processes that facilitate the development of intuition, or alternative channels of perception. In welcoming all aspects of knowing, the group feedback process can strengthen members’ confidence regarding their intuitive experiences and ameliorate the invalidation of growing up in a world biased for logical thinking.
demonstration-experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Define intuition and list the Nine Traits of A Highly Intuitive Person.
2. State how an "Invalidation Wound" happens, how it affects intuitive people, and why it leads to the cluster of systems typically seen in highly intuitive and creative people who present for treatment in our offices, i.e., feeling emotionally overwhelmed, anxiety, self doubt, destructive behaviors, and fears of being exposed as a fraud.
3. Create an environment that encourages members to share all forms of their moment-to-moment experiences including images, body sensations, and "irrational" emotions.
4. List the risks and advantages of sharing intuitive experiences in a group setting.

Course References:
1. Billow, R.M. (2013). Sense and Clinical Sensibility, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 63:4, 474-501.
2. Cohen, S.L. (2011). Coming to our senses: The application of somatic psychology to group psychotherapy, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 61:3, 396-413.
3. Hinshelwood, R.D. (2008). Group therapy as psychic containing, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 58:3, 283-302.
4. Holmes, L. (2009). The technique of partial identification: Waking up to the world, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59:2, 253-265.
5. Richarz, B. (2008). Group process and the therapists's subjectivity: Interactive transference in analytical group psychotherapy, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 58:2, 141-161.

Workshop 67-5
Putting the INTENSIVE Back in Intensive Outpatient Group Programs

Chairs:
Valorie George, MSW, LCSW,
 Petoskey Center, Private Practice, Houston, Texas
Elyssa Fink Gottheim, MSW, LCSW, Petoskey Center, Private Practice, Houston, Texas
Kacie Liput, MSW, LCSW, Petoskey Center, Private Practice, Houston, Texas
Jennifer Markey, PhD, MEd, Petoskey Center, Private Practice, Houston, Texas

Intensive treatment means challenging patients to explore their internal and external worlds in a manner that addresses symptoms, personality structures, and relational patterns. This workshop introduces practitioners to an integrative treatment model utilizing various group therapies, milieu building, and dynamically oriented staff meetings to create opportunities for learning, insight, and growth.
experiential-demonstration-sharing of work experiences-didactic

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe an integrative model for intensive outpatient group programming which addresses patient issues across emotional, cognitive, and behavioral domains.
2. Summarize ways of building a strong, supportive milieu in an effort to create a more conducive learning environment.
3. Explain the use of staff meetings to deepen understanding of patient and milieu issues and ways of exploring transference and countertransference dynamics.
4. Describe mentalizing techniques that can be utilized to enhance self/other awareness.
5. Describe cognitive-behavioral techniques used to explore problematic behaviors and to identify effective skills that can be utilized in place of these behaviors.
6. Describe the use of genograms to explore family of origin and current interpersonal patterns.

Course References:
1. Allen, J. G. (2013). Mentalizing in the development and treatment of attachment trauma. London: Karn.
2. Titleman, P., Ed. (2014). Differentiation of self: Bowen family systems theory perspective. New York, NY.
3. Linehan, M. M. (2015). DBT skills training manual, second edition. New York, NY: Guildford Press.
4. Schlapobersky, J. R. (2016). Lost or found in the transference? Transference, countertransference, projection, and identification in groups. In From the Couch to the Circle: Group Analytic Psychotherapy in Practice. pp. 359-392.

Workshop 68-5
Mirror, Mirror on the Screen: The Image Reflected Back to Us Online (iSIG Meeting with Coffee)

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Internet, Social Media, and Technology SIG

Chairs:
Jason Berman, PhD, CGP,
 Private Practice, Dallas, Texas
Robert Hsiung, MD, Private Practice, Chicago, Illinois

People can show discrepant angles of themselves online and in person. How discrepant? Participants interact anonymously online for one week prior to the meeting and then in a fishbowl at the meeting. Online, they interact on a message board under assigned pseudonyms. At the workshop, observers receive a transcript of the posts. After the fishbowl, all participants try to match pseudonyms to fishbowl members. We conclude with a general discussion of identity and Internet culture.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. List differences between interacting online and in person.
2. Describe how fishbowl members were different online and in person.
3. Describe how fishbowl members were similar online and in person.

Course References:
1. Bodle, R. (2013). The ethics of online anonymity or Zuckerberg vs. "Moot". SIGCAS Computers and Society , 43, 22-35. http://doi.org/10.1145/2505414.2505417.
2. Griffiths, K. M., Mackinnon, A. J., Crisp, D. A., Christensen, H., Bennett, K., & Farrer, L. (2012). The effectiveness of an online support group for members of the community with depression: A randomised controlled trial. PLoS ONE , 7 (12), e53244. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0053244.
3. Mohr, D. C., Burns, M. N., Schueller, S. M., Clarke, G., & Klinkman, M. (2013). Behavioral intervention technologies: Evidence review and recommendations for future research in mental health. General Hospital Psychiatry , 35 (4), 332-338. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2013.03.008. 
4. Santana, A. D. (2014). Virtuous or Vitriolic. Journalism Practice, 8 (1), 18-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2013.813194.
5. van der Nagel, E., & Frith, J. (2015). Anonymity, pseudonymity, and the agency of online identity: Examining the social practices of r/Gonewild. First Monday , 20 (3). http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v20i3.5615.

Workshop 69-5
The Use of Miniatures to Enhance the Group Psychotherapy Experience

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Child and Adolescent SIG and the Women in Group Psychotherapy SIG

Chair:
Andrea Grunblatt, PhD, RPT-S, CGP, FAGPA,
Owner and President, Grunblatt Psychology and Counseling Offices, P.C., Kingston, New York 

This workshop will address the power of each group member choosing a particular miniature as representation of themselves.  The workshop will further explore how disclosing the meaning of that miniature is a safe way to overcome group members’ resistances and vulnerabilities. The workshop will explore this through didactics, experiential and sharing workshop members' experiences. This approach to group therapy will be contrasted to regular talk group therapy.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Integrate miniatures into group therapy.
2. Use miniatures to overcome group members' resistances and vulnerabilities.
3. Experience the advantages of utilizing miniatures in groups rather than pure talk therapy.

Course References:
1. Elliot, M. (2017). Sandtray Therapy: Everything You Need To Know To Start Using Sandtray Therapy With Your Clients Today. Kindle.
2. Gil, E. (1944). Play in Family Therapy. The Guilford Press.
3. Sweeney, D., Baggerly, J. & Ray, D. (2014). Group Play Therapy: A Dynamic Approach. Routledge.

Workshop 70-5
Healing through Integration: Exploring How Functional Subgrouping Changes the Story

Chairs:
Dayna Burnett, PhD,
 Private Practice, Austin, Texas
Susan Lange, PhD, Private Practice, Houston, Texas

Systems close to new information as a survival strategy. Change and growth emerge from integrating new information. Using Functional Subgrouping (developed by Dr. Yvonne Agazarian), participants will explore behaviors that lead to opening and closing boundaries within the individual and the group, and a theoretical framework for understanding this experience.
didactic-demonstration-experiential-sharing of work experiences

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Demonstrate how curiosity and interest open boundaries within a person and among members in a group.
2. Practice Functional Subgrouping as a method for exploring the experience of open and closed boundaries.
3. Apply Functional Subgrouping and experience how this contributes to change by co-creating a context where boundaries can become permeable and open to integration of new information in the person and in the group, thereby reducing fragmentation.

Course References:
1. Agazarian, Y.M. (2016). Attunement, Empathy, and the Triune Brain. Systems-Centered News, 24(1), 4-10.
2. Agazarian, Y.M. (2015). Person-as-a-System Revisited. Systems-Centered News, 23(1), 7-13.
3. Agazarian, Y.M. (2015). Using the Role System Map. Introduction: Mapping Role Systems. Systems-Centered News, 23(2), 5-8.
4. Agazarian, Y.M. (1997). Systems-centered therapy for groups. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Re-printed in paperback (2004). London, UK: Karnac Books. 
5. Gantt, S.P., & Agazarian, Y.M. (Eds.) (2005). SCT in action: Applying the systems-centered approach in organizations. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse. Reprint (2006). London, UK: Karnac Books.

Workshop 71-5
To Use or Not to Use? Being Vulnerable with Substance Use: Running Integrative Harm-Reduction Psychotherapy Groups

Chair:
Adam Frankel, PhD, CGP,
Clinical Psychologist, The Center for Optimal Living, New York, New York

This workshop will focus on identifying core principles and themes of Integrative Harm-Reduction Psychotherapy (IHRP) and practice the application of IHRP clinical strategies in a group setting to help deepen vulnerability, openness, and increase positive change goals with those negotiating substance misuse challenges.
 experiential-didactic-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify three core principles of Integrative Harm-Reduction Psychotherapy (IHRP).
2. Identify three practical skills-based interventions from an IRHP group framework that can be used in a group setting to help individuals identify and move towards positive change goals.
3. Identify two ways in which IHRP is different from AA or abstinent only treatment models.

Course References:
1. Tatarsky, A. (1998). An integrative approach to harm reduction psycho-therapy: A case of problem drinking secondary to depression. In Session: Psychotherapy in Practice, 4, 9–24.
2. Kellogg S. H., Tatarsky A. Harm reduction psychotherapy. In: Fisher G. L., Roget N. A., editors. Encyclopedia of substance abuse prevention, treatment, and recovery. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications; 2009. pp. 444–449.
3. Tatarsky, Andrew (2003): Harm reduction psychotherapy: Extending the reach of traditional substance use treatment, Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment , Volume 25, Issue 4 , 249 - 256.
4. Kellogg, S. H., & Tatarsky, A. (2012). Re-envisioning Addiction Treatment: A Six-Point Plan. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 30(1), 109–128.
5. Tatarsky A., Kellogg S. Integrative harm reduction psychotherapy: A case of substance use, multiple trauma, and suicidality. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session. 2010;66:123–135.

Workshop 72-5
Child Group Therapy: What Can We Learn From Its Infancy?

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children & Adolescents SIG 

Chair:
Aaron Fink, MD, CGP,
Private Practice, Houston, Texas

Sam Slavson's Activity Group Therapy (AGT) was the original model for working with children in a therapy group.  While this nondirective psychoanalytically based approach feels dangerous (physically and emotionally) to most therapists today, there is much that we can learn from it.  Using video of AGT, we will expand our ideas about how to run groups.  We will also explore what this model can teach us about leading groups with adolescent and adults.
demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences-experiential

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:   
1. Describe their affective reactions to watching a video of Activity Group Therapy.
2. Describe the structure of Activity Group Therapy.
3. Compare and contrast Activity Group Therapy with more modern models of group therapy with children.

Course References:
 1. Johnson, C.V., Riester, A.E., Corbett, C., Buehler, A., Huffaker, L., Levich, K., and Pena, E. (1998). Group activities for children and adolescents: An activity group therapy approach. Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy, 8, 71-88.
2. Scheidlinger, S. (1992). Therapist gender in child-adolescent treatment groups. Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy, 2, 105-108.
3. Slavson, S. R. (1944). Some elements in activity group therapy. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 4, 578-588.
4. Slavson, S. R. (ed.) (1947). The Practice of Group Therapy. New York: International Universities Press.
5. Troester, J. D. (1998). The value of a social work practicum in activity group therapy. Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy, 8, 207-211.

Workshop 73-5
Sex, Drugs, and Social Media: Ethically Informed Group Therapy Practice with Adolescents (Part 2)

Attendees must attend workshop 63-5

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children and Adolescents SIG

Chair:
Thomas Hurster, MSS, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA, 
Adjunct Professor of Clinical Social Work, Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

This workshop will focus on common clinical challenges and dilemmas encountered in group therapy with teens, viewed through the lens of reflective ethical problem-solving. Difficult behavioral situations frequently encountered in working with troubled youth will be explored through small group problem-solving exercises and a whole group question/discussion period.
didactic-experiential-sharing of work experiences-demonstration

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Distinguish between ethical principles, professional codes, and state regulations and how they apply to work with adolescents.
2. Discuss the limits of confidentiality in psychotherapy with youth, and the merits of signed informed consent forms with both adolescents and their families.
3. Identify methods of working clinically with difficult and potentially destructive behaviors and decisions of adolescent therapy participants.
4. Recognize the impact of the ever-changing technological world on the clinical realities of working with youth.

Course References:
1)  Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated- the social lives of networked teens. New Haven: Yale University Press.
2)  Hurster, T. (2016). Ethically informed group practice. In (Haen, C. and Aronson, S. (eds.) Handbook of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy: A Practioner's Reference. New York:  Routledge.
3)  James, C., et. al. (2008). Young people, ethics, and the new digital media: A synthesis from the good play project. Online monograph: GoodWork Project Report Series, No. 54, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.
4)  MacNair-Semands, R. (2005). Ethics in group psychotherapy. New York: American Group Psychotherapy Association.
5)  Phelan, J.R. (1974). Parent, teacher, or analyst: the adolescent-group therapist's trilemma. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 24(2), 238-44.

Workshop 74-5
Queering Group Therapy: Beyond Homonormative Clinical Care Models

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,Transgender, and Queer Issues SIG

Workshop 64-5 is a pre-requisite

Chairs:
Grace Ballard, MA,
Therapist and Educator, Queer Asterisk, Denver, Colorado
Sorin Thomas, MA, LPC, LAC, Executive Director and Clinical Supervisor, Queer Asterisk Therapeutic Services, Boulder, Colorado

What does it actually take to create space for queer and trans clients? We will consider issues specific to group therapy with queer and transgender populations, including how to utilize the intersecting identities of the group leader to create safer space. We will look beyond “homonormative" clinical care models, and discuss the implications (relevant to everybody) of queering group therapy.
experiential-demonstration-didactic-sharing of work experiences

 

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:  
1. Differentiate between biological sex, sexuality, and gender identity.
2. Identify diversity inherent within each of these categories.
3. Deconstruct concepts of "heteronormativity" and "homonormativity" and explore the umbrella terms "queer" and "trans."
4. Explore the clinical themes that arise when working with marginalized groups of intersecting identities.
5. Develop better practice guidelines for working with the intersectionality of queer identities as they pertain to biological sex, sexuality, and gender identity.

Course References:
1. Conant, E., & Hammond, R. (2017). In Their Words: How Children Are Affected by Gender Issues. National Geographic.
2. National Gay and Lesbian Task Force & National Center for Transgender Equality. (2010). National Transgender Discrimination Survey. Washington D.C.
3. Ormont, L. R. (1992). The group therapy experience: From theory to practice. New York, NY: St. Martin's Press.
4. Steinmetz, K. (2014). The Transgender Tipping Point. Time Magazine.
5. World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) Standards of Care version 7 (2011).
https://s3.amazonaws.com/amo_hub_content/Association140/files/Standards%20of%20Care%20V7%20%202011%20WPATH%20(2)(1).pdf.
6. Yalom, I. D. (1970). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy. Basic Books, New York.


Memorial Session

6:15-7:30 PM

A time to commemorate members of the AGPA family we have lost this past year.

 


Group Foundation Evening Event
9:00 P.M.

Featuring: The Grooves

Join us for a night of music and entertainment with The Grooves. This spectacular Austin band is one of the best show and dance bands you will find. The Grooves have an amazing combination of different genres of music and will cover the gamut of all hit favorites, old and new. This band always plays the right songs at the right time at the right volume and is known as a heavyweight in the dance band category in Austin and across Texas. The Grooves will play from 9:00 PM – 12:30 AM followed by an After Party with a DJ from 12:30 – 2:00 AM

This event is included with the five-day Institute and Conference package or the three-day Conference registration.


 Thursday, March 1:    

Saturday, March 3:

 Click here to register now!

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