78th Annual Conference Sessions and Workshops
Thursday, February 25 (Details)

All-Day Courses
All-Day Workshops
Morning Open Sessions
Morning Workshops
Lunch-Time Open Session
Afternoon Open Sessions
Afternoon Workshops

For more information on those presenters who have the CGP credential, please click on their names to view their CGP profiles. 

All-Day Courses
(11:00 am-1:30 pm & 2:45-5:15 pm-Eastern)


C1. Core Principles of Group Psychotherapy, Part II
Presented in cooperation with the International Board for Certification of Group Psychotherapists

Directors:
Mikhail (Misha) Bogomaz, PsyD, ABPP, CGP, Co-Director,
University of North Florida Counseling Center, Jacksonville, Florida 
Jen Martin, PhD, CGP, Co-Director,
Private Practice, Sage Wellness, Gainesville, Florida

Faculty:
Karen Cone-Uemura, PhD, CGP, Staff Psychologist, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Annie Weiss, LICSW, CGP, FAGPA, Group Seminar Leader, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts
Tevya Zukor, PhD, CGP, Director/Psychologist, Talley Center for Counseling Services, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, Virginia

This course provides the experiential component (Part II) of the Principles of Group Psychotherapy course. Participants must have completed the didactic component (Part I) prior to attending. When combined with Part I, this course will complete the 15-hour course work required for CGP certification. Participants are expected to be familiar with the AGPA publication Core Principles of Group Psychotherapy: An Integrated Theory, Research, and Practice Training Manual. The course will bridge the gap between conceptual understanding and real life experiences.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Detect the impact of membership in a group on the understanding of group dynamics.
2. Identify group dynamics, e.g. resistance, scapegoating and sub­group formation, as they arise. 
3. Discuss the creation of norms.  
4. Compare the stages of group development.
5. Discuss the role of the leader.
6. Discuss diversity impact on group dynamics and leadership.


Course References:
1. American Group Psychotherapy Association, Inc. (2007). Practice Guidelines for Group Psychotherapy, New York: AGPA. 
2. Kaklauskas F., Greene, L. (2019). Core Principles of Group Psychotherapy (1st Edition). Routledge. 
3. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.  
4. Ribeiro, D., Michele (2020). Examining social identities and diversity issues in group therapy: knocking at the boundaries. Routledge.
5. Rutan, J.S. & Alonso, A. (1999). Reprise: Some guidelines for group therapists. In J.R. Price, D.R. Hescheles, & A.R. Price (Eds.), A guide to starting psychotherapy groups (pp. 71­79). San Diego, CA: Academic Press. 
6. Rutan, J., Alonso, A., & Groves, J. (1998). Understanding defenses in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 38, 549­472.


C2. Contemporary Adolescent Group Psychotherapy: Method, Madness, and the Fun - A Practical Guide
Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Children and Adolescents SIG

Directors:
Seth Aronson, PsyD, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, New York, New York
Thomas Hurster, MSS, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA, A
djunct Professor of Clinical Social Work, Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
Andrew Pojman, EdD, CGP, FAGPA,
Oasis Center, Private Practice, Walnut Creek, California

The treatment of adolescents in group is a particularly challenging endeavor.  This course will offer concrete and practical information that will enrich the participants' ability to either run an on-going group or the excitement and support needed to start  a new group.  A demonstration group, special guest lecturers, and our own group interaction will provide a rich learning experience.  Topics to be taught include group theory, managing countertransference, and addressing diversity issues.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1.  List at least three features of adolescent development related to the self, peer relationships, and emotions.
2.  Demonstrate sensitivity to adolescent cultures especially as it relates to the formation and development of group and the group process.
3.  Discuss the impact of transference and countertransference on the adolescent group.
4.  Identify how diversity colors the life of the adolescent both within and outside of the group.
5.  Cite three new intervention techniques.
6.  Identify their own personal response to identity, diversity, and culture as manifested within the adolescent group.


Course References:
1. Haen, C., & Aronson, S. (Eds.). (2017). Handbook of child and adolescent group psychotherapy: A practitioner’s reference. New York, NY: Routledge
2. Hurster, T. (2017). Ethically informed group practice. In C. Haen & S. Aronson (eds) Handbook of child and adolescent group psychotherapy: A practitioner’s reference (pp.66-79). New York, NY: Routledge.
3. Malekoff, A. (2014). Group work with adolescents: Principles and practice (3rd ed.).  New York, NY: Guilford.
4. Pojman, A. (2009). Adolescent Group Psychotherapy: Method, Madness, and the Basics. New York, NY: American Group Psychotherapy Association.
5. Rachman, A., & Ceccoli, V. (1995). Analyst self-disclosure in adolescent groups.
In P. Kymissis & Halperin (Eds.), Group Therapy with Children and   Adolescents (pp. 155- 167), Washington D.C.: American Psychiatric Press.
6. Steen, S., Vannatta, R., Liu, X. (2017) Cultural considerations in group work:  Implications for school and clinical mental health settings.  In C. Haen & S. Aronson (eds) Handbook of child and adolescent group psychotherapy: A practitioner’s reference (pp. 255-265). New York, NY: Routledge.
7. Stone, D.T., & Thomas, A.C. (2012). A multidisciplinary treatment team model or youth offenders in correctional treatment centers: Applying psychodynamic group concepts.  In J. Kleinberg (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Group Psychotherapy (pp.645-664). 
8. Shechtman, Z. (2007). Group Counseling and Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents: Theory, Research, and Practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.


All-Day Workshops
(11:00 am-1:30 pm & 2:45-5:15 pm-Eastern)


Workshop 1a. Zooming in or Zooming Out? Decoding Online Body Language: Accessing the Core Blueprints for Immediacy in Virtual Group

Instructors:
Chap Attwell, MD, MPH,
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, New York, New York 
Liz Stewart, APSI,
Private Practice, Boulder, Colorado

If 85% of communication is non-verbal and 85% of mental life is unconscious, then paying keen attention to overtly visible body language in group work can provide a bridge to decode non-verbal, unconscious communication between members in real time. Whether through strengthening attachment bonds or heightening the group’s sense of immediacy, our work attempts to construct new avenues for interpersonal connection.  We now aim to translate our research to the zoom format!


Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Demonstrate the utility of working with the superficial layer of the group connective tissue via the creation of a mutually agreed-upon framework for the workshop.
2. Identify the core ingredients of working with body language in the group setting.
3. Define the two working models--the neurobiology of body language and the anatomy of connective tissue--which we propose integrating in direct application to decoding body language in group work.  
4. Identify body language as observable into three distinct observable layers: voice tone and pitch; gestures/postures; and collective body movements amongst multiple members.
5. Integrate the observable group as a whole phenomena with shared language--naming, translating, distinguishing, explaining, and clarifying-- to explore deeper if seemingly hidden/unconscious communications amidst our group process.
6. Expand the didactic model of our group process to create a model of the mind and its take-away applications for our participants’ personal and professional lives.


Course References:
1. Berger, M.M. (1958).  Nonverbal Communication in Group Psychotherapy.  International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 8, 161-178.
2. Matsumoto, D., Frank, M., & Hwang, H.S. (2013).  Non-verbal Communication:  Science and Applications.  New York: Sage Publications.
3. Navarro, J.  (2008). What Every Body Is Saying:  An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed Reading People.  New York: William Morrow Paperbacks.
4. Rolf, I.  (1991).  Rolfing and Physical Reality.  Rochester, VT:  Healing Arts Press.
5. Lesondak, D. (2017).  Fascia: What is is and why it matters.  East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom: Handspring Publishing Limited.
6. Meyers, T. (2021).  Anatomy Trains: Myofascial Meridians for Manual Therapists  & Movement Professionals. Elsevier Limited. ISBN 9780702078132


Workshop 2a. Social Dreaming as a Generative Pathway to Reflective and Deliberative Citizenship

Instructor:
George Bermudez, PhD, PsyD,
Psychologist-Psychoanalyst, Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis Los Angeles, Pasadena, California

This workshop will accomplish three objectives:  lecture on the power of social dreaming as a communal healing and generative practice; a social dreaming matrix with a focus on unconscious citizenship, and  reflection and deliberation on the emergent dream themes with application to  optimal citizenship.  Participants will co-create a social dream matrix, generating new ideas for optimal citizenship. The entire process has three steps: Social Dream Exploration; Reflection and Insight concerning  the Social Unconscious; and Social Application for Optimal Citizenship.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe two differences between the conventional approach to working with dreams and the socialdreaming (SDM) paradigm. 
2. Define two concepts out of the following related to social dreaming: group self or social state dream, forward edge of social dream, self-object function of communal home and moral witnessing function of social dreams.
3. Identify two resistances related to social linking and moral witnessing of “culturally imposed trauma”. 
4. Identify two essential techniques for leadership/facilitation of a social dreaming matrix.
5. Describe the value of social dreaming in accessing the social unconscious for optimal citizenship and democracy

Course References:
1. Bermudez, G.  (2019). Community psychoanalysis: A contribution to an emerging paradigm, Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 39:5, 297-304, DOI: 10.1080/07351690.2019.1623582
2. Bermudez, G.  (2018). The social dreaming matrix as a container for the processing of implicit racial bias and collective racial trauma, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68, 538-560. DOI:10.1080/00207284.2018.1469957 
3. Fishkin, J.S. (2018). Democracy when the people are thinking: Revitalizing our politics through public deliberation. London: Oxford University Press. 
4. Fromm, M.G. (2017). National nightmares: Thoughts on the genesis and legacy of perpetrator trauma: OPUS Keynote Lecture. Organisational & Social Dynamics, 17, 111-126.
5. Manley, J. (2018). Social dreaming, associative thinking and intensities of affect. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
6. Manley, J. (2014). Gordon Lawrence’s social dreaming matrix: Background, origins, history, and developments. Organisational & Social Dynamics, 14,322-341
7. Mojovic, M. (2019). The Balkans on the reflective-citizens couch unraveling social-psychic-retreats. In A. Zajenkowski & U. Levin (Eds.). A psychoanalytic and socio-cultural exploration of a continent: Europe on the couch (pp.175-187). London: Routledge.


Workshop 3a. Utilizing Restorative Circles to Explore Barriers to Inclusion and Authenticity in Organizations

Instructors:
Kouang Chan, MS, JD,
Ombuds, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Duke Fisher, MA,
CEO, Lead Trainer-Facilitator at Learning Laboratories, Bainbridge, New York
Nina Harris, BA, CA,
Alternative Dispute Resolution Officer, M,.I.T., Cambridge, Massachusetts
Deborah Sharp, LCSW-S, CGP,
Conflict Management and Dispute Resolution Office, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Brelynn Thomas, MSSW,
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Amy Wolfgang, MA,
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

Participants explore Restorative Practice, facilitator techniques, its potential for community building and participate in a circle examining barriers in manifesting identities in AGPA. The didactic portion explores the ‘whole organizational approach’ using restorative methods for community building, problem solving, transformation of harm and individual restorative coaching.  Co-facilitated Group breakout circles utilize talking pieces to explore participants’ identity. The workshop will culminate in a circle exploring participant identities that are difficult to manifest in this organization.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify one way that Restorative Practices can be used within organizations.
2. Identify two ways that Restorative Practice can enhance my group work.
3. Identify three techniques used within the Restorative Justice Circle that supported differences.
4. Identify two similarities and two differences between a Restorative Justice Circle and a Psychotherapy Group.
5. Identify two similarities and two differences between a Restorative Justice Circle and a 12 step Group.
6. Identify the ways that a talking piece is similar to sand tray figures.
7. Identify the ways that a talking piece can enhance communication in the circle.


Course References:
1. Baliga, S., et al. (2017). Restorative Community Conferencing; A study of Community Works West’s restorative justice youth diversion program in Alameda County.  
2. Clark, K. L. (2014). A call for restorative justice in higher education judicial affairs. College Student Journal, 48(4), 707–715. 
3. González, T., Buth, A., & Sattler, H. (2018). New directions in whole-school restorative justice implementation. Conflict Resolution Quarterly, 36(3), 207–220. 
4. Karp, D. (2013). The little book of restorative justice for colleges and universities: Repairing harm and rebuilding Trust in Response to student misconduct. Intercourse, PA: Good Books. 
5. Karp, D., & Sacks, C. (2014). Student conduct, restorative justice, and student development. Contemporary Justice Review, 17(2), 1–19. 
6. Lake, P. F. (2009). Student discipline: The case against legalistic approaches. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 55(32), A31–A32. 
7. Llewellyn, J. (2015). An unfamiliar justice story: Restorative justice and education: Reflections on Dalhousie's Facebook incident 2015. Our Schools, Our Selves, 25(1), 43–56. 
8. Marshall, C. (2016). The evolution and meaning of the restorative city ideal: An introductory essay. Victoria University of Wellington. Unpublished. 
9. National Association of Community and Restorative Justice. (2018). NACRJ policy statement on restorative justice in higher education. Retrieved from https://www.nacrj.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14&Itemid=129 
10. Pranis, K., & Boyes-Watson, C. (2015). Circle forward: Building a restorative school community. St. Paul, MN: Living Justice Press. Schrage, J., & Thompson, M. (2011). Providing a spectrum of resolution options. In J. Schrage & N. Giacomini (Eds.), Reframing campus conflict: Student conduct practice through a social justice lens (pp. 65–86). Sterling, VA: Stylus
11. Sheila M. McMahon, David R. Karp, Hayley Mulhern. (2019) Addressing individual and community needs in the aftermath of campus sexual misconduct: restorative justice as a way forward in the re-entry process. Journal of Sexual Aggression 25:1, pages 49-59.
12. Cunningham, L. (1997). The therapist’s use of self in sandplay: Participation mystique and projective identification. Journal of Sandplay Therapy, 5, 121-135.


Workshop 4a. Group Goes to Business School: Teaching Interpersonal Dynamics in Troubling Times (AGPA Leadership Track)
Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Organizational Consulting SIG

Instructors:
Darryl Pure, PhD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA,
University of Chicago, Booth School of Business, Chicago, Illinois
Lisa Stefanac, MBA

Open to participants with four or more years of group psychotherapy experience

Group Therapists have skills valued and transferable to Business. This workshop will explore Interpersonal Dynamics through exercises and T-group (an Experiential Training Group) experiences, that combined with readings and coached journals prepares MBA candidates at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business to lead in a variety of settings. Crucial is using the experiential T-group as a laboratory to facilitate members' learning to learn. Participants will learn how their skill-set can translate to the fast-paced world of corporate culture.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify group approaches relevant to business vs. psychotherapy.
2. Compare interpersonal dynamics with intrapersonal dynamics.
3. Experience exercises that aid interpersonal dynamics for business and organizational leadership.
4. Identify the value of data generating exercises for the work of the group.

Course References:
1. Argyris, C.  (2000). Good Communication That Blocks Learning. HBR OnPoint  by Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation.
2. Bradford, D.L., & Huckaby, M. T-groups and the Nature of Experiential Learning in the Interpersonal Dynamics Reader. Bradford, D.L. & Huckaby, M., Stanford Graduate School of Business.
3. Bradford, D., Dexter, G., & Robin, C. (2003). Introducing the Pinch Theory: Building Relationships at Work. In Interpersonal Dynamics for High Performance Leaders. Stanford University Graduate School of Business.
4. Francisco & Richard, P. (1999). Five levels of communication: A model that works across cultures. In the Reading Book for Human Relations Training (8th edition) published by the NTL Institution for Applied Behavioral Science. 
5. Gee, K. (2019). Stanford Pushes Executives to Get 'Touchy-Feely'. Wall Street Journal, May 1, 2019.
6. Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Bantam Books:. 
7. Ibarra, H. (2015). The Authenticity Paradox: Why feeling like a fake can be a sign of growth.
Harvard Business Review January–February.
8. Kennedy-Moore, E., & Watson, J. (2001). How and When Does Emotional Expression Help?. Review of General Psychology. 5. 187-212. 10.1037/1089-2680.5.3.187.
9. Porter, L. (1982). Giving and Receiving Feedback; It Will Never be Easy But It Can Be Easier. NTL Reading Book for Human Relations Training, NTL.

Morning Open Sessions
1 ½ Hour Open Sessions
(11:00 am 12:30 pm-Eastern)


201-5. Who Do You Think You Are?: Exploring Group Leader Cultural Identity and Stereotype Assumptions Made About Group Members
Presented under the auspices of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Identities SIG, the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force, and the Racial and Ethnic Diversity SIG

Instructor:
Robin Dean, PsyD,
Licensed Psychologist, Huthings Psychiatric Center, Syracuse, New York

This open session offers the opportunity for participants to better understand the complexity of intersectionality by exploring the various aspects of their own cultural identity. Attendees will be challenged to process how they see themselves and how others in the world see them. The presenter will also raise awareness of group participants as individuals with various cultural affiliations and prepare practitioners to be sensitive to the whole person, rather than make assumptions based group participant's cultural identity.

Learning objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify at least five areas of cultural identity.
2. Demonstrate awareness of the assumptions they make about group members based on cultural stereotypes.
3. Describe benefits and drawbacks of having preconceived notions of group participants.
4. Articulate at least one change that they could make to their group practice to account for the complexity of their clients' cultural identity.

Course References:
1. Carter, R. T., & Johnson, V.E. (2018, November 26). Racial identity statuses: Applications to practice. Practice Innovations, 4(1), 42-58.
2. Clauss-Ehlers, C.S., Chiriboga, D.A., Hunter, S.J., & Roysircar, G. (2019). APA Multicultural Guidelines executive summary: Ecological approach to context, identity, and intersectionality. American Psychologist, 74(2), 232-244.
3. Dunn, D.S. & Andrews, E.E. (2015). Person-first and identity-first language. American Psychologist, 70(3), 255-264.
4. Hays, P.A. (2016). Addressing Cultural Complexities in Practice, 3rd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
5. Ertl, M., Mann-Saumier, M., Martin, R.A., Graves, D.F., & Altarriba, J. (2019). The impossibility of client-therapist “match”: Implications and future directions for multicultural competency. Journal of Mental Health Competence, 41(4), 312-326. https://doi.org/10.17744/mehc.41.4.03
6. Hook. J.N., Davis, D.E., Owen, J., Worthington, E.L., & Utsey, S.O. (2013). Cultural humility: Measuring openness to culturally diverse clients. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 60(3), 353-366.

202-5. Telehealth Drop-in Support Group
Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Internet, Social Media, and Technology SIG


Chair:
Nadia Greenspan, LCPC, NCC, CGP

Presenters:
Rosa Lee Emerson, PhD, CGP
Kasra Khorasani, MD, CGP, Staff Psychiatrist,
St. Joseph's Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario 
Thomas Treadwell, EdD, TEP, CGP,
Psychologist, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The 90-minute open session will help enhance the experiential learning by both describing the evolution and creation of the original COVID support group. Additionally, the group format is developed from group members’ feedback regarding their experience of the analog group at the conference.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe the therapeutic factors [instillation of hope, secure emotional expression, awareness of relational impact, social learning] active in this group format.
2. List five basic criteria for setting up a Tele-health Covid support group.
3. Discuss the benefits and shortcomings of Covid 19 group format.
4. Develop zoom group rules for engagement.
5. Describe three ways to support front line workers. 
6. Identify the group developmental stages [forming, storming, norming & performing] in this group format

Course References:
1. Banbury, A., Chamberlain, D., Nancarrow, S., Dart, J., Gray, L., Parkinson, L. (2017). Can videoconferencing affect older people’s engagement and perception of their social support in long-term conditions: A social network analysis from the telehealth literacy Project. Health and Social Care. 25, (3). https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12382
2. Ganote, C., Cheung, F., & Souza, T. (2015). Don’t remain silent!: Strategies for supporting yourself and your colleagues via microresistances and ally development. In Roy, P., Harrell, A., Milano, J., & Bernhagen, L. (Eds). POD Diversity Committee White Paper at the 40th Annual POD Conference (pp. 3-4). San Francisco, CA.
3. Leszcz, M. (2020). Promoting our colleagues’ wellbeing: Group work with healthcare providers. Presented at The American Group Psychotherapy Association, E-learning, March 30th.
4. Parker-Pope, T. (July 10, 2018). The Power of Positive People. New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2020.

Morning Open Sessions
2 ½ Hour Open Sessions 
(11:00 am-1:30 pm-Eastern)


301. Shame and Humiliation in Group Therapy: Be Careful What You Wish For

Instructors:
Joseph Shay, PhD, CGP, LFAGPA, Chair,

Private Practice, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Aaron Black, PhD, CGP, FAGPA, Private Practice, Rochester, New York
Chera Finnis PsyD, CGP, FAGPA, Private Practice, New York, New York
Molyn Leszcz, MD, FRCPC, CGP, DFAGPA, University of Toronto, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Oona Metz, LICSW, CGP, FAGPA, Private Practice, Brookline, Massachusetts

A core value of group therapy is the exposure of painful vulnerabilities in order to promote self-acceptance and change.  Members will at times experience the shame and humiliation that comes with such exposure and react with withdrawal or aggression. Leaders, exposed as well, may also experience shame and humiliation—and may also withdraw or aggress. Using video clips as a jumping off point, we will explore skillful ways to intervene to encourage exposure while mitigating damage to vulnerable members and leaders.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Recognize signs of shame and humiliation that may result from such expression of vulnerabilities. 
2. Review ways to encourage the open expression of vulnerabilities in group.
3. Identify therapist vulnerabilities to shame and humiliation in oneself.
4. Describe skillful group therapy interventions in the context of group member or group leader experiences of shame or humiliation or the derivatives of these.

Course References:
1. Allpress, J. A., Brown, R. L., Giner-Sorolla, R., Deonna, J. A., & Teroni, F. (2014). Two faces of group-based shame: Moral shame and image shame differentially predict positive and negative orientations to ingroup wrongdoing.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1270–1284.
2. Black, A. (2017). On attacking and being attacked in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67, 291-313.
3. Gans, J.S., & Weber, R.L. (2000). The detection of shame in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 50, 381–396. 
4. Lefforge, N.L., Mclaughlin, S., Goates-Jones, M., & Mejia, C. (2020). A training model for addressing microaggressions in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 70, 1-28, DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2019.1680989 
5. Slepian, M. L., Kirby, J. N., & Kalokerinos, E. K. (2020). Shame, guilt, and secrets on the mind. Emotion, 20, 323–328. https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000542

302. Finding Collective Shelter: A Theme Directed Audience Discussion in the Year of COVID-19 and Battles for Racial Justice (Part 1)
Presented in cooperation with Greenleaf Strategies, LLC

Instructors:
Kathy Ulman, PhD, CGP, DFAGPA,
Assistant Professor Psychiatry (Psychology), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Aziza Belcher Platt, PhD, Private Practice, Atlanta, Georgia
Suzanne Phillips, PsyD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA, Adjunct Faculty and Supervisor in Postdoctoral Programs, Derner Institute, Adelphi University, Garden City, Long Island
Latoyia Piper, LCSW, CGP, Adjunct Faculty Member, Cabrini University Social Work Department, Radnor, Pennsylvania
Craig Haen, PhD, LCAT, CGP, FAGPA, Founder and Program Director, Klint Institute, New York, New York
Siddharth Ashvin Shah, MD, MPH, CEO Greenleaf Integrative, LLC, Arlington, Virginia

This Open Session offers a Theme Directed Audience Discussion to bear witness to the medical, racial, and societal traumatic events we have endured this past year. It invites the audience to be co-participants in bearing witness and addressing the personal and professional impact on the multiple aspects of self and one's role as a mental health professional. As we return together to AGPA Connect 2021, we recognize the need for discussion as a community.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Discuss at least three emotional reactions experienced by professionals who contracted COVID-19
2. Discuss at least three emotional reactions experienced by professionals who experience racism in professional and personal settings
3. Discuss three examples of the emotional impact on the mental health of patients living through the pandemic of COVID-19.  
4. Discuss three examples of emotional impact on the mental health of patients experiencing and impacted by the pandemic of individual and systemic racism.
5. Discuss at least two reactions experienced by BIPOC in hearing information regarding the disproportionate number so BIPOC affected by COVID-19.
6. Discuss two reactions you had and patients had when working on a virtual platform with patients and/or groups during the pandemic and two reactions to returning to your office. 

Course References:
1. Akbar, M. (2017). Urban trauma: A legacy of racism.New York: Your Purpose Press.
2. D'Angelo R. (2018).  White fragility: Why it's so hard for white people to talk about racism?  New York:  Beacon Press. 
3. Phillips, S. (2012). Medical Illness as Psychological Trauma: Overlooked Pain. Psych Central Retrieved on June  30, 2020 from https://blogs.psychcentral.com.ealing-together/2012/04/medical-illness-as-psychological-trauma-overlooked-pain/
4. Ribiero, M.D. (2020). Examining social identities  and diversity issues in group therapy: Knocking at the boundaries. New York, NY: Routledge.
5. Sandine, A. (2020). CoVID-19 frontline healthcare workers at risk of mental health problems in Medical News Today. March 25, 2020. https://www.,medicalnewstoday.com/articles/covid-19-frontline-healthcare-workers-t-risk-of-mental-health-problems
6. Weinberg, H., & Rolnic, A. (Eds.) (2020). Theory and practice of online therapy: Internet-delivered interventions for individuals, groups, families, and organizations.  New York: Routledge.

303. "GROUP" - A Modern Analytic Video Training Series

Instructors:
Elliot Zeisel PhD, LCSW, CGP, DFAGPA,
Founder/Faculty, Center for Group Studies, New York, New York
John Caffaro, PhD, CGP, FAGPA, Distinguished Professor, California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles, California

The Open Session will provide an opportunity for participants to view portions of the series GROUP and engage in a discussion of effective clinical practice with John Caffaro, PhD and Elliot Zeisel, PhD. Additionally, we will focus on how the series can be used to enhance university and group therapy training programs and its potential to increase public awareness of the value and effectiveness of group psychotherapy. **Registrants are required to view this video before the event: https://www.youtube.com/grouptheseries.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify core treatment principles and interventions in psychodynamic group process.
2. Compare key elements of the Modern Analytic and Interpersonal/Relational approach to group psychotherapy. 
3. Demonstrate the power of the here and now in process groups to catalyze understanding and explore the connections between member to member and member to leader.

Course References:
1. Zeisel, E. (2009). Affect education and the development of the interpersonal ego in modern group psychoanalysis. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59(3), 421-432. DOI: 10:1521/ijgp.2009.59.3.421
2. Caffaro, J.V. (2015). Interpersonal Integrative Group Therapy. In Encyclopaedia of Theory in Counseling and Psychotherapy. Neukrug, E. (Ed.). SAGE.  
3. Levine, R. (2017). A modern psychoanalytic perspective on group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67:sup1, S109-S120. 
4. Black, A. (2019). Treating insecure attachment in group therapy: Attachment theory meets modern psychoanalytic technique. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 69(3), 259-286.
5. Chang-Caffaro, S. & Caffaro, J. (2018). Differences that make a difference: Diversity and the process group leader. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68(4), 483-497. DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2018.1469958

Morning Workshops
1 ½ Hour Workshops
(11:00 am-12:30 pm-Eastern)


Workshop 5-5. The Universe of Group Psychotherapy:  Global Strategies for Success

Instructors:
Judith Coche, PhD, ABPP, CGP, LFAGPA,
Clinical Professor, Perelman Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Greg Crosby, MA, LPC, CGP, FAGPA, Crosby Counseling, Lake Oswego, Oregon

Harnessing the power of Group Psychotherapy provides clinical skills in multiple intelligence essential to global work in interpersonal growth in our rapidly changing world!  Learn how to go beyond spoken language to adapt group theory and practice to world citizens of any location. Join a global teaching group and make yourself at home clinically wherever you are.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Apply theories of multiple intelligence and Yalom's Therapeutic Factors in Group Psychotherapy to specific cultures within our globe.
2. Conduct teaching key skills to citizens of different cultures through adaptation of key ideas 
3. Revise teaching and clinical content to adapt to each culture to maximize effectiveness of universal group therapy principles described by Yalom, Coche, and Crosby in academic writings.

Course References:
1. Coche, J. (2010). Couples Group Psychotherapy: A Clinical Treatment Model (in press since 1991), 2nd edition. New York: Routledge. 
2. Coche, J. The Couples Communication Workbook, fifth edition. 
3. McGoldrick, M., Giordana, J., & Garcia-Preto, N. (2005). Ethnicity & family therapy (Third Edition). New York: Guilford.
4. Moodley, R., Lo,T., & Zhu, N. (2018). Asian healing traditions in counseling and psychotherapy. Los Angeles: Sage Publishing.
5. Rathod, S., Kingdon,D., Pinninti, N.,Turkington, D., & Phiri, P. (2015). Cultural adaption of CBT for serious mental illness: A guide for training and practice. New York: Wiley Blackwell.

Workshop 6-5. Integration through Bodily and Verbal Movements

Instructors:
Bojun Hu, PhD,
United Family Hospital, Shanghai, China
Lizhu Zhao, MA

Using movement exercises, participants will pay attention to sensory and emotional patterns in themselves and in the online group-as-a-whole. Physical and verbal patterns will be explored along the dimension of distance and connection. How do we experience a more supported, integrated usage of the body, mind, and speech, across physical distance?

Learning Objectives:

The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify the ways in which the participant utilizes or avoids the support of other members’ words and bodies for support and connection.
2. Describe the congruence/discordance in one’s verbal communication and bodily posture/emotional expression/sound expression.   
3. Experiment and practice grounded ways of bodily expression/movement and verbal expression.
4. Identify cultural variations in the use of one’s body and one’s words.

Course References:
1. Jerak, T., Vidrih, A., & Zvelc, G. (2018). The experience of attunement and misattunement in dance movement therapy workshops. Arts in Psychotherapy, 60, 55-62.
2. Mignosi, E. (2019). Bridges between people: nonverbal mediation in an intercultural perspective and training proposals. Studi sulla Formazione, 22, 265-281. 
3. Van der kolk, B. (2014). Learning to inhabit your body: Yoga. In The Body Keeps the Score (pp. 265-278). New York, NY: Penguin Books. 
4. Westland, G. (2009). Considerations of verbal and non-verbal communication in body psychotherapy. Body, Movement, and Dance in Psychotherapy 4(2), 121-134. 
5. Wittig, J. (2010).  The body and nonverbal expression in dance/movement group therapy and verbal group therapy.  Group, 34(1), 53-66.

Workshop 7-5.
CANCELLED


Thursday Morning Workshops
2 ½ Hour Workshops
(11:00 am-1:30 pm-Eastern)

Workshop 8. Germans and Jews: A Conversation About Trauma and Group Processes

Instructors:
Karsten Kueppenbender, MD, CGP,
Instructor in Psychiatry, part-time, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Mendel Horowitz, MS, CGP, Staff Therapist, The Family Institute, Jerusalem, Israel 

In times of social and racial unrest, it is important that clinicians create a safe place for difficult ethnic dialogues in group psychotherapy. Attending to cultural traumas in group psychotherapy can play a role in addressing and healing deep psychological wounds that result from historical and personal narratives. This experiential interaction between a German psychiatrist and Orthodox Jewish psychotherapist will demonstrate key issues necessary to effectively address race and ethnicity in group psychotherapy.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Detect race/ethnic/cultural dialogues in group psychotherapy.
2. Describe race/ethnic/cultural identity as a key element in group psychotherapy.
3. Demonstrate dealing with and facilitating emotionally charged difficult race/ethnic/cultural dialogues in group psychotherapy.
4. Evaluate and discuss cultural ethical boundaries in group therapy race dialogues.
5. Describe group psychotherapists as role models.

Course References:
1. Altfeld, D. A. (1999). An Experiential Group Model for Psychotherapy Supervision. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 49:2, 237-254.
2. Bemak, F., & Chung, R. (2019). Race Dialogues in Group Psychotherapy: Key Issues in Training and Practice. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 69:2, 172-191. 
3. Gans, J. S. (2010). Difficult topics in group psychotherapy: My journey from shame to courage. London: Karnac Books.
4. von Sommaruga Howard, T. (2019). Sociopolitical Trauma: Forgetting, Remembering, and Group Analysis. Transactional Analysis Journal, 49:4, 233-247.
5. Weinberg, H. (2014). The paradox of internet groups. Alone in the presence of virtual others. London: Karnac Books.

Workshop 9. The Romance of Togetherness: How Do Leader and Group Members Relate to the Erotic?

Dominick Grundy, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, New York, New York

What attracts us to groups? Terms like cohesion and alliance are useful, but is there also an erotic aspect of desiring to know and be known by others? Addressing sexuality is fruitful when the leader supports exploration while protecting members from shame or re-traumatization. We begin with a play (written by the leader) on the power of attraction and risks of boundary violation. Then we explore how to safely navigate erotic interactions in group.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Challenge the common assumption that exploring erotic feelings belongs in individual psychotherapy, not in group. 
2. Discriminate behavior in group interaction which may be motivated either by underlying erotic feelings or by undue anxiety about erotic arousal. 
3. As group leader, recognize the power of underlying erotic feelings and guide group process so as not to disregard them or retraumatize members with history of sexual abuse.

Course References:
1. Billow, R. (2002). Passion in group: Thinking about loving, hating and knowing. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 52(3): 355-72.
2. Hadar, B. (2019). The body in group analysis. Group Analysis 53(4). 544-556. 
3. Nitsun, M. (2006). The group as an object of desire: Exploring sexuality in group therapy. New York: Routledge.
4. Schwartz, K. (2019). Sexuality, intimacy, and group psychotherapy with older adults. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 69(1). 126-144.
5. Wahr-Haftig, L. (2018). When patients fall in love: A challenge to group analysis. Group Analysis, 51(2). 117-129.

Workshop 10. Microaggressions Under the Microscope: A Practical Approach to Identifying, Unmasking, and Exploring Implicit Bias in Group Psychotherapy

Presented under the auspices of the Racial and Ethnic Diversity SIG and the Group Training and Supervision SIG

Instructors:
Shemika Brooks, PsyD, CGP,
Johns Hopkins University Counseling Center
Nathasha Hahn, PhD, Florida International University, Miami, Florida
Shelby Weltz, PsyD, New York University, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York

Barriers to group facilitators responding to microaggressions include a pervasive fear of “messing up” and having insufficient sensitivity to identify microaggressive statements, actions, and inactions. Rather than to focus on ways to intervene, this workshop will provide explicit opportunities to identify microaggressions that may arise in group counseling spaces. Participants will practice identifying microaggressions and unmasking the impact of their harmfulness, through examination and discussion of different cultural perspectives.

Learning Objectives: 
The attendee will be able to:
1. Explain the actual or potential negative impact of microaggressions.
2. List five examples of microaggressions (statements, actions, and/or inactions) in the context of group counseling spaces.
3. Identify the role that increased awareness plays in reducing microaggressive behavior. 
4. Describe the ways in which the impact of microaggressions, rather than the intent, result in interpersonal harm.
5. Discuss the ways in which the intersection of member identity and group composition impact the felt experience of microaggressions.

Course References:
1. Bemak, F. & Chi-Ying Chung, R. (2019). Race dialogues in group psychotherapy: Key issues in training and practice. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 69(2). 172-191. DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2018.1498743
2. Cone-Uemura, K., & Bentley, E.S. (2018). Multicultural/diversity issues in groups. In M. D. Ribeiro, J. M. Gross, & M. M. Turner (Eds.), The college counselor’s guide to group psychotherapy (pp. 21-35). Routledge.
3. Kaklauskas, F. J., & Nettles, R. (2020). Towards multicultural and diversity proficiency as a group psychotherapist. In F. J. Kaklauskas & L. R. Greene (Eds.), Core principles of group psychotherapy: An integrated theory, research, and practice training manual (pp. 25-45). Routledge.
4. Lefforge, N. L., Mclaughlin, S., Goates-Jones, M., & Mejia, C. (2020). A training model for addressing microaggressions in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 70(1), 1-28. DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2019.1680989
5. Owen, J., Drinane, J. M., Tao, K. W., DasGupta, D.R., Zhang, Y., & Adelson, J. (2018). An experimental test of microaggression detection in psychotherapy: Therapist multicultural orientation. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 49(1), 9-21. DOI: 10.1037/pro0000152
6. Smith, L. C., & Shin, R. Q. (2008). Social privilege, social justice, and group counseling: An inquiry. Journal For Specialists In Group Work, 33(4), 351-366. doi:10.1080/01933920802424415
7. Stevens, F., & Abernethy, A. (2018). Neuroscience and racism: The power of groups for overcoming implicit bias. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68(4), 561-584. doi: 10.1080/00207284.2017.1315583
8. Sue, D. W. (2010). Microaggressions in everyday life: Race, gender, and sexual orientation. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
9. Sue, D. W., Capodilupo, C. M., Torino, G. C., Bucceri, J. M., Holder, A. B., Nadal, K. L., & Esquilin, M. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for clinical practice. American Psychologist, 62(4), 271-286. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.62.4.271
10. Williams, Monnica T. (2020). Psychology cannot afford to ignore the many harms caused by microaggressions. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 15(1), 38-43. DOI: 10.1177/1745691619893362

Workshop 11. Enlivening Therapy Groups Through Play and Adventure

Instructor:
Barney Straus, MSW, MA, CGP, FAGPA,
Part Time Faculty, Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL, Private Practice

This workshop will explore the impact of using interactive games and problem-solving challenges with therapy groups. The workshop will begin a presentation about the theory of Adventure-Based Counseling.  Several online activities will then be demonstrated. A discussion at the conclusion will focus on application to other group settings.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Explain how to effectively incorporate novel activities into process-oriented groups.
2. Describe how to use metaphoric transfer of learning to heighten therapeutic impact of the group.
3. Select specific activities based on the stage of development and primary purpose of a particular group.

Course References:
1. Cummings, Pimsler, & Sherman (2017).  Facilitated Growth: Experiential activities for recovery and wellness.  Dubuque, Iowa, Kendall Hunt.
2. Dohud, W., Cavanaugh, & Harper (2020). Adventure Therapy and Routine Monitoring of Treatment: the time is now.  In The Journal of Experiential Education, Vol. 43 #3, pp.262-276.
3. Gass, M.A. (1993).  Adventure Therapy: Therapeutic applications of adventure programming.  Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.
4. Schoel, J., Prouty, D., & Radcliffe, P. (1988).  Islands of Healing: A guide to adventure based counseling.  Hamilton, MA: Project Adventure.
5. Straus, B. (2018). Healing in Action: Adventure-Based Counseling with Therapy Groups. Langham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
6. Wolfe, B.D., & Dattilo, J. (2006). Participants’ perceptions of communication during and after a one-day challenge course program.  Journal of Experiential Education.  Vol. 29, # 2, pp. 126-144.
7. Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M. (2005).  The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.

Workshop 12. Close Reading and Reflective Writing: How Storytelling Facilitates Group Process

Instructors:
Lynn Lawrence, MS, MSW,
Narrative Medicine Program, Columbia University, New York, New York 
Lynne Bamat Mijangos, RN, MSW, MFA, MS, Columbia University, New York, New York

Narrative practice is a perfect venue for group process. By offering a text (the written word,
a page from a graphic novel, a piece of music, a work of art) , and deconstructing it in close reading, or in the case of art, close looking, we are able to become more attuned to the all the nuances of the stories of suffering and illness our clients are bringing to us.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify at least one group in their practice in which close reading (or “looking”) and reflective writing might be incorporated to aid in group process.
2. Describe how multiple points of view in a text contributes to the development of intersubjectivity.
3. Choose a text and practice crafting a prompt for a new or ongoing group.
4. Reflect on “discoveries” made in today’s writing.

Course References:
1. Burack-Weiss, A., Lawrence, L.S., & Mijangos, L.B., (Eds.). 2017. Narrative in Social Work Practice : The Power and Possibility of Story. New York: Columbia University Press.
2. Charon, R. (2006). Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. New York: Oxford University Press.
3. Charon, R., DasGupta, S., Hermann, N., Irvine, C., Marcus, E.R., Colón, E.R., Spencer, D., & Spiegel, M. (2017). The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine. New York: Oxford University Press.
4. Hermann, N., (2017). “Creativity : What, Why, and Where?”. In R.Charon et al. (Eds.), The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine. New York: Oxford University Press.
5. Kandel, E.R. (2012). The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain. New York :Random House.

Workshop 13. Confronting Aggressive Scapegoating in Group Therapy and Society: An Ethical Obligation of Mental Health Clinicians as Demonstrated by the Berkeley Civic Courage and Heroism Experiment

Instructors:
Bill Roller, MA,
Berkeley Group Therapy Institute, Berkeley, California
Xu Yong, MD, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, China

Open to participants with four or more years of group psychotherapy experience

New Research has investigated the situational context that allows individuals to follow their conscience, taking nonviolent courageous action to defend ethical principles and people in need, all in the public interest. The Berkeley Experiment developed a method to create a cohesive social network within a small group of volunteers who were able to act on a project chosen by the group. Participants will replicate some of its group dynamics, including stopping aggessive scapegoating and intergrating the Scapegoat Leader into group.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Apply with confidence and assertiveness the group dynamics necessary to create a Strategic Subgroup that supports conscientious behavior.
2. Discriminate between sociocentric and egocentric leadership on the part of the Task Leader.
3. Re-direct the scapegoating process and actively resist aggressive scapegoating both inside and outside the group boundary.
4. Differentiate between the necessity for the Task Leader to stop aggressive scapegoating and the requirement to help integrate the Scapegoat Leader into the group as a whole.
5. Identify the group norms that facilitate collaborative leadership in the completion of a project of ethical significance.
6. Enumerate the specific norms that drive group communication forward and those forces that restrain group communication.

Course References:
1. Agazarian, Y. (1992). Contemporary Theories of Group Psychotherapy: A Systems Approach to the Group-as-a-Whole. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 42,(2), 177-205.
2. Beck, A.P (1981) "The Study of Group Phase Development and Emergent Leadership." GROUP, 5, 48-54.
3. Beck, A.P. (2014) "The Natural Evolution of Work Teams and Their Leaders." Presented at Texas A & M University, Department of Psychology, Corpus Christi, Texas.  An unpublished article.
4. Miller, A.G. (1986) The Obedience Experiments: A Case Study of Controversy in Social Science. New York: Praeger.
5. Roller, B., & Zimbardo, P. (2017). The Berkeley Civic Courage and Heroism Experiment: The Group Dynamics of Individuals Acting in Concert to Advance Ethical Goals in the Public Interest. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67 (3).
6. Ilfeld, F. (2018). Group dynamics and the new heroism: The ethical alternative to the Stanford Prison Experiment. A Video Review. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68(1), 124-131.
7. Roller, B. (2018). Response to Fred Ilfeld's review of group dynamics and the new heroism: The ethical alternative to the Stanford Prison Experiment. Correspondence. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68(2), 290-291.

Workshop 14. Motivational Interviewing Groups: Moving Together Toward Change

Instructor:
Christopher Wagner, PhD


This presentation will demonstrate key Motivational Interviewing (MI) group concepts and practices.   MI is an empathic, goal-oriented therapeutic approach that works from within client perspectives to help them develop more fulfilling lives, using their personal values to establish forward direction and their strengths to bring their vision to fruition.  MI groups integrate MI core components, AGPA Taskforce recommendations, and humanistic and positive psychology concepts in order to harness the power of group support, cohesion and momentum.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a working knowledge of MI concepts and practices. 
2. Describe key issues in adapting MI to group therapy.
3. Define the four phases of MI groups.
4. Summarize the various practice exercises used in MI groups.
5. Demonstrate knowledge of the various key ways of shaping group conversations toward change.

Course References:
1. Houck, J. M., Hunter, S. B., Benson, J. G., Cochrum, L. L., Rowell, L. N., & D’Amico, E. J. (2015). Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 29(4):941-949. PMCID: PMC4701607
2. D’Amico, E. J., Houck, J. M., Hunter, S. B., Miles, J. N. V., Osilla, K. C., & Ewing, B. A. (2015). Group motivational interviewing for adolescents: Change talk and alcohol and marijuana outcomes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83(1), 68-80. PMCID: PMC4324015
3. Wagner, C.C., & Ingersoll, K.S. (2017). Development and Initial Validation of the Assessment of Motivational Interviewing Groups – Observer Scales (AMIGOS).  International Journal of Group Psychotherapy.  DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2017.1315587
4. Shorey, R.C., Martino, S., Lamb, K.E., LaRowe, S.D., Santa Ana, E.J. (2015). Change talk and relatedness in group motivational interviewing: a pilot study. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.
5. Santa Ana, E.J., LaRowe, S.D., Armeson, K., Lamb, K.E., & Hartwell, K. (2016). Impact of group motivational interviewing on enhancing treatment engagement for homeless Veterans with nicotine dependence and other substance use disorders: A pilot investigation. American Journal of Addiction.

Master Workshop 15. Coping with Aging in Ourselves and Our Clients: The Challenges to Continuing to be Resilient and Engaged Group Therapists

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Health and Medical Issues SIG and the Issues of Aging SIG

Instructors:
Ken Schwartz, MD, FRCPC
Shayne Vitemb, MA, LMFT, CGP,
Private Practice, El Segundo, California

Open to participants with ten or more years of group psychotherapy experience

In reflecting and sharing feelings regarding issues of aging and illness in ourselves and clients, therapists come to understand how we are impacted in our personal lives and clinical practice and are better able to meet the challenge of remaining empathically connected. Recent changes in society such as COVID-19 and new political movements ask us to explore the question of how we now fit in.  Must we isolate or can we still be engaged? If so, how?

Learning Objectives:

The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify importance of both hope and action in coping with health issues.
2. Appraise one’s own personal feelings with respect to issues of aging and medical disability and its impact on working with this population.
3. Identify three practices/techniques that facilitate the psychological healing process in older adults with medical problems.
4. Apply a series of questions emphasizing the value of understanding both ourselves and clients as it relates to our clinical work with a challenging population of older adults.
5. Discuss the challenges associated with both consideration of retirement and retirement itself.

Course References:
1. Agronin, M.E. (2018). The End of Old Age: Living a Longer, More Purposeful Life. New York: Da Copa Press.
2. Silver, M.P. (2018). Retirement and Its Discontents: Why We Won’t Stop Working , Even If We Can. New York: Columbia University Press.
3. Goldman, B. (2018). The Power of Kindness: Why Empathy is Essential in Everyday Life. Toronto: Harper Collins Publishers Ltd.
4. Vitemb, S.A. (2018). Talkin' 'Bout My Generation: Existentialism, Aging, and Newly Emerging Issues in Group Therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68, 337-351.
5. Orlinsky, D.E., & Ronnestad, M.H.,(2015). Psychotherapists Growing Older: A Study of Senior Practitioners: Journal of  Clinical Psychology: In Session, 7(11), 1128-1138.

Workshop 16. Conducting Time-Limited Interpersonal Group Therapy in a Training Program

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Group Training and Supervision SIG

Instructors:
Laura Kasper, PhD, CGP,
Private Practice, Stanford University School of Medicine, San Francisco, California 
Meena Denduluri, MD, Stanford Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, California 

We will present one model of training psychiatry residents in group therapy facilitation. This model could be used in any training program where there are time constraints for running a group. The model is based off of Focused Brief Group Therapy developed by Dr. Martyn Whittingham, long-term interpersonal groups run in the modern analytic style, integrating T-group components from an interpersonal dynamics business school course. We will discuss the core components of setting up the group, recruitment, facilitation, and supervision.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe the design of a currently practiced model of brief interpersonal groups.
2. Describe one example of evidence supporting interpersonal groups and time limited therapies.
3. Explain how to use the IIP-32 and OQ-45 in setting goals for a short-term interpersonal group. 
4. Explain how a group contract can be used in facilitation of an interpersonal group. 
5. Identify three characteristics of patients who would be appropriate for referral to a time-limited group.

Course References:
1. Whittingham, M. (2018). Innovations in group assessment: How focused brief group therapy integrates formal measures to enhance treatment preparation, process, and outcomes. Psychotherapy, 55(2), 186.
2. Ormont, L.R. (1988). The Leader's Role in Resolving Resistances to Intimacy in the Group Setting. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. 38 (1), 29-45.
3. Kirman, J.H. (1995). Working with Anger in Groups: A Modern Analytic Approach. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. 45 (3), 303-329.
4. Zeisel, E. M. (2009). Affect Education and the Development of the Interpersonal Ego in Modern Group Psychoanalysis. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 59 (3), 421-432.
5. MacKenzie, K. R. (1996). Time-limited group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 46(1), 41-60.
Chicago
6. Black, A. E. (2017). On attacking and being attacked in group psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67(3), 291-313.
7. Black, A. E. (2019). Treating insecure attachment in group therapy: Attachment theory meets modern psychoanalytic technique. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 69(3), 259-286.

Workshop 17. Transcending Gender: How to Start a Group for Adults who are Exploring their Gender Identity


Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Identities SIG

Instructors:
Natalie Haziza, MA, M.Phil,
Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Ari Pehkonen, LCSW, Cambridge Health Alliance, Somerville, New York

The presenters will discuss how they started a gender identity exploration group in their outpatient hospital clinic. There is a growing need for groups that make space for clients to openly discuss issues pertaining to gender identity and expression. Topics will include group recruitment, group leader identities and disclosure, and vignettes from the group. We will also focus on gender exploration in middle adulthood, pronoun use, transitioning to telehealth during COVID19, and ensuring group member diversity.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe unique considerations and challenges clinicians might face when starting a gender identity group for adults.
2. Describe how groups can be utilized to aid in the exploration of gender identity in adulthood.
3. Name unmet needs of gender-diverse adults in outpatient mental health clinics.
4. Describe ways to expand group offerings for gender-diverse populations to include gender identity groups for middle adulthood.
5. Apply ideas presented in the workshop to meet needs of diverse populations.

Course References:

1. Burnes, T. R., Singh, A. A., Harper, A. J., Harper, B., Maxon-Kann, W., Pickering, D. L., & Hosea, J. U. L. I. A. (2010). American Counseling Association: Competencies for counseling with transgender clients. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 4(3-4), 135-159.
 2. Dickey, L. M., & Loewy, M. I. (2010). Group work with transgender clients. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 35(3), 236-245.
 3. Elder, A. B. (2016). Experiences of older transgender and gender nonconforming adults in psychotherapy: A qualitative study. Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity, 3(2), 180.
 4. Heck, N. C. (2017). Group psychotherapy with transgender and gender nonconforming adults: evidence-based practice applications. Psychiatric Clinics, 40(1), 157-175.
 5. Heck, N. C., Croot, L. C., & Robohm, J. S. (2015). Piloting a psychotherapy group for transgender clients: Description and clinical considerations for practitioners. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 46(1), 30.


Thursday Afternoon
Open Sessions
1 ½ Hour Open Sessions
(2:45 pm 4:15 pm-Eastern)


203-5.Effective Advocacy for Your College Counseling Group Program

Instructors:
Nathasha Hahn, PhD, Chair,
Florida International University, Miami, Florida 
Joeleen Cooper-Bhatia, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
Niki Keating, PhD, CGP, Counseling and Psychological Services, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York

This panel discussion will focus on imparting specific strategies to effectively meet your group program needs. Attendees will be able to identify solutions to common barriers, highlight methods to improve based on the program’s stage of change, learn effectual advocacy strategies, as well as engage in self-assessment to improve advocacy skills. Many of the strategies consider the college counseling setting. However, group clinicians who wish to learn more about effective advocacy are encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify barriers to group therapy services based on the source of resistance of the counseling center system.
2. Determine appropriate interventions based on the group program’s stage of change. 
3. List at least three tangible strategies that can be used to advocate for group program needs.
4. Engage in a self-assessment to determine how one’s professional and personal style could serve as an asset or barrier to group program effectiveness.

Course References:
1. Brunner, J. L., Wallace, D. L., Reymann, L. S., Sellers, J. J., & McCabe, A. G. (2014). College counseling today: Contemporary students and how counseling centers meet their needs. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 28(4), 257-324.
2. Daly, J. A. (2011). Advocacy: Championing ideas and influencing others. Yale University Press.
3. Denton, L., Gross, J., & Wojcik, C. (2016). Group counseling in the college setting: An international survey of center directors. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 1-25.
4. Ribeiro, M. D., Gross, J. M., & Turner, M. M. (2018). The college counselors guide to group psychotherapy. New York: Routledge
5. Whittingham, M. (2013). Group work in college and university counseling centers.  In J. Delucia-Waack., & M. Riva. The Handbook of Group Counseling and Psychotherapy (2nd Edition). Washington DC: Sage Books.

Thursday Afternoon Open Sessions
2 ½ Hour Open Sessions
(2:45 pm-5:15 pm)

304. Finding Collective Shelter: A Theme Directed Audience Discussion in the Year of COVID-19 and Battles for Racial Justice (Part 2)


Presented in cooperation with Greenleaf Strategies, LLC

Instructors:
Kathy Ulman, PhD, CGP, DFAGPA, Assistant Professor Psychiatry (Psychology), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Aziza Belcher Platt, PhD, Private Practice, Atlanta, Georgia
Suzanne Phillips, PsyD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA, Adjunct Faculty and Supervisor in Postdoctoral Programs, Derner Institute, Adelphi University, Garden City, Long Island
Latoyia Piper, LCSW, CGP, Adjunct Faculty Member, Cabrini University Social Work Department, Radnor, Pennsylvania
Craig Haen, PhD, LCAT, CGP, FAGPA, Founder and Program Director, Klint Institute, New York, New York
Siddharth Ashvin Shah, MD, MPH, CEO Greenleaf Integrative, LLC, Arlington, Virginia

This Open Session offers a Theme Directed Audience Discussion to bear witness to the medical, racial, and societal traumatic events we have endured this past year. It invites the audience to be co-participants in bearing witness and addressing the personal and professional impact on the multiple aspects of self and one's role as a mental health professional. As we return together to AGPA Connect 2021, we recognize the need for discussion as a community.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Discuss at least three emotional reactions experienced by professionals who contracted COVID-19
2. Discuss at least three emotional reactions experienced by professionals who experience racism in professional and personal settings
3. Discuss three examples of the emotional impact on the mental health of patients living through the pandemic of COVID-19.  
4. Discuss three examples of emotional impact on the mental health of patients experiencing and impacted by the pandemic of individual and systemic racism.
5. Discuss at least two reactions experienced by BIPOC in hearing information regarding the disproportionate number so BIPOC affected by COVID-19.
6. Discuss two reactions you had and patients had when working on a virtual platform with patients and/or groups during the pandemic and two reactions to returning to your office. 
7. Discuss the meaning and impact of structural racism, intergenerational racism, and institutionalized racism.
8. Discuss two principles for managing discussions around differences of worldview or societal opinions among group members.
9. Discuss how the shared experiences in a year of trauma related to COVID-19, the pandemic of institutionalized racism, battles for racial justice, and societal upheaval have impacted your personal and professional lives.
10. Discuss the recognition of coping with grief in yourself and your patients.
11. Discuss how our organization can provide a safe and nurturing environment following this year of turmoil and change.

Course References:
1. Akbar, M. (2017). Urban trauma: A legacy of racism. New York: Your Purpose Press.
2. D'Angelo R. (2018).  White fragility: Why it's so hard for white people to talk about racism?  New York:  Beacon Press. 
3. Phillips, S. (2012). Medical Illness as Psychological Trauma: Overlooked Pain. Psych Central Retrieved on June  30, 2020 from https://blogs.psychcentral.com.ealing-together/2012/04/medical-illness-as-psychological-trauma-overlooked-pain/
4. Ribiero, M.D. (2020). Examining social identities and diversity issues in group therapy: Knocking at the boundaries. New York, NY: Routledge.
5. Sandine, A. (2020). CoVID-19 frontline healthcare workers at risk of mental health problems in Medical News Today. March 25, 2020. https://www.,medicalnewstoday.com/articles/covid-19-frontline-healthcare-workers-t-risk-of-mental-health-problems
6. Weinberg, H., & Rolnic, A. (Eds.) (2020). Theory and practice of online therapy: Internet-delivered interventions for individuals, groups, families, and organizations.  New York: Routledge.

305. From the Circle to the Screen - Online Groups

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Internet and Social Media SIG

Instructors:
Haim Weinberg, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
Chair, Sacramento Center for Psychotherapy, Sacramento, California
Richard Billow, PhD, ABPP, CGP, Clinical Profession, Derner Institute, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York
Ruthellen Josselson, PhD, Fielding Graduate University, Baltimore, Maryland
Bram van der Boom, MD, Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Coronavirus crisis forced therapists to move online without enough training and preparation. Online groups create new challenges due to porous boundaries and losing control of the setting: how to stay emotionally connected, maintain confidentiality, etc. In this open session one of the panelists will conduct an online video demo group, while the other panelists comment, each from a different theoretical perspective (relational, interpersonal, schema therapy); We explore the dynamics of these groups and the group therapist's interventions.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. State the impact of the lack of the body on Internet delivered therapy.
2. Explain the need for specific training for online group therapists.
3. Apply different theoretical models to leading online groups.
4. Compare online and f2f therapy.
5. Identify ways to develop presence online
6. State some research finding about online therapy groups.

Course References:
1.  Kolmes, K. (2013). An introduction to APA's Telepsychology Guidelines. California Psychologist, 46(6): 28.
2. Luxton, D.D., Nelson, E., & Maheu, M.M. (2016). A Practitioner’s Guide to Telemental Health: How to Conduct Legal, Ethical, and Evidence-based Telepractice. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
3. Scharff, J. S. (2018). Psychoanalysis Online 4. London: Routledge.
4. Turkle, S. (2016). Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age. New York: Penguin Books.
5. Weinberg, H. (2014). The paradox of Internet Groups: Alone in the presence of virtual others. London: Karnac.
6. Weinberg, H., & Rolnick, A. (2019). The theory and practice of online therapy. New York: Routledge.

Afternoon Workshops
1 ½ Hour Workshops
(2:45 pm 4:15 pm-Eastern)

Workshop 18-5. Of Mice and Mentors: Applying Learning Theory to Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy

Instructor:
Russell Hopfenberg, PhD, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice & Duke University, Duke University School of Medicine, Raleigh, North Carolina

This workshop will connect psychodynamic group psychotherapeutic practice to general findings from the experimental analysis of behavior.  Clinical interventions, the change process and the amelioration of emotional difficulties will be explained / discussed from the perspective of learning theory and radical behavioral philosophy.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe response generalization (induction) and its relevance to group psychotherapy.
2. Summarize “cultural behavior” and its relevance to resistance in group psychotherapy.
3. Explain the connection between Pavlovian conditioning and emotional difficulties as well as their amelioration in psychodynamic group psychotherapy

Course References:
1. Gans, J.S. (1996). The Leader's Use of Indirect Communication in Group Therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 46(2), 209-228.
2. Dennen, D. (2020). Behaviorism and Mind: BF Skinner. www.Academia.edu.  
3. Hopfenberg, R. (2015). Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy: A Behavior Science Perspective. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 65(3), 329-356.
4. Rutan, J.S., Stone, W.N., & Shay, J.J. (2007). Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy (4th Ed.). New York: Guilford.
5. Rutan, J.S., & Alonso, A. (1994). Some guidelines for group therapists. Group, 18, 56-63.
6. Skinner, B.F. (1953). Science and Human Behavior. New York: Macmillan.
7. Zillo, D, (2016). On the Autonomy of Psychology from Neuroscience: A Case Study of Skinner's Radical Behaviorism and Behavior Analysis. Review of General Psychology, 20(2) 155-170.

19-5. A No-Judgment Zone Helps Heal Addiction

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Addiction and Recovery SIG

Instructors:
Geoffrey Kane, MD, MPH,
Chief of Addiction Services, Brattleboro Retreat, Brattleboro, Vermont
Suzanne Brennan Nathan, PsyD, LICSW, CGP, Psychology and Clinical Social Work, Private Practice, West Roxbury, Massachusetts

To think and communicate, we automatically employ categories, which are open to bias.  When we encounter people who fit into categories different from our own, we may look down on them with judgments that can have harmful unintended consequences.  Group participation reduces this tendency.  This workshop explores ways group psychotherapists can help clients become more aware of this liability and adopt language and other behaviors that avoid unhelpful categorizations while cultivating the authentic connections needed for addiction recovery.

Learning Objectives:

The attendee will be able to:
1. List six words (categories, labels) related to substance use disorders that can fuel bias and therefore are best avoided by professionals and the public.
2. Compare the impact on treatment outcomes of addiction treatment programs that specify client behavior during and after treatment (including behavior in groups) with those of programs that individualize their expectations. 
3. Describe two methods for avoiding bias and maintaining person-centeredness in groups.
4. Identify two practices that can prepare you to be person-centered when interacting with clients.

Course References:
1. Cote, M. (2013). How categorical thinking creates a biased view of the world. Inspire Solutions. Article in November 13, 2013 issue devoted to “Us and Them.”
2. Badenoch, B., & Cox, P. (2010). Integrating interpersonal neurobiology with group psychotherapy, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 60(4), 462-482.
3. Gantt, S.P. & Agazarian, Y.M. (2010). Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: Linking Systems-Centered Training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 60(4), 515-543.
4. Gino, F., Minson, J., & Yeomans, M. (2020). The Right Way to Talk across Divides. Scientific American, April 21, available online.
5. Wagner, C.C., & Ingersoll, K.S. (2013). Motivational Interviewing in Groups. New York: Guilford Press.

Workshop 20-5. Countering Mental Health Stigma in a Depression Support Group with Positive Psychotherapy

Instructors:
Heather Holtman, EdD,
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 
Serena Tchania, MA, CUNY, New York, New York

During the workshop we will be sharing the modules from the Depression Support Group including gratitude and forgiveness and discussing how the group helped students move from trepidation about group therapy out of fear of stigma and toward a more genuine relating.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. State how a Positive Psychotherapy support group for depression reduces college student’s fear of stigma.
2. Describe concepts of positive psychology used to structure the Depression Support Group.
3. Identify activities used to create a Positive Psychotherapy Depression Support Group.

Course References:
1. Corrigan, P.W., Kosyluk, K.A., Markowitz, F., Brown, R.L., Conlon, B., Rees, J., Rosenberg, J. Blefson, S., Al-Khouja, M. (2016). Mental illness stigma and disclosure in college students. Journal of Mental Health. 25(3), 224-230.  doi.org/10.3109/09638237.2015.1101056
2. Seligman, M. E. P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5-14. doi: 10.1037//0003-066X.55.1.5.
3. Rouhollahi, M., Khodabakhshi, A., & Taghvaee, D. (2016). Effects of positive psychology on irrational beliefs and quality of life in depressed patients. Indian Journal of Positive Psychology, 7, 209-211.      
http://www.iahrw.com/index.php/home/journal_detail/19#list.
4. Seligman, M. E. P., Rashid, T., & Parks, A. C. (2006). Positive psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 774- 788.
5. Corrigan, P. W., Druss, B. G., & Perlick, D. A. (2014). The impact of mental illness stigma on seeking and participating in mental health care. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 15, 37-70. doi: 10.1177/1529100614531398.

Afternoon Workshops
2 ½ Hour Workshops
(2:45 pm-5:15 pm-Eastern)


Workshop 21. Waist Deep in the Big Muddy: Leveraging Group Process to Work Through the Climate Change Impasse

Instructor:
Benjamin White, LCSW, CGP,
Private Practice, Lafayette, Colorado

This hybrid process and didactic session will engage members in a process that stimulates the underlying psychological mechanisms behind human caused climate change, and the ongoing impasse in response to this ongoing, and massively disruptive dilemma. Participants will experimentally encounter the unconscious dynamics at play, then reflect on the experience with guidance and a suggested framework from the presenter. Participants will be encouraged to use their experience in the group to deepen their work with this issue.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify unconscious processes that are relevant to human-caused climate change.
2. Describe intersections between climate change and other social justice issues.
3. Describe their own emotional contribution to the issue of climate change.
4. Differentiate between various modes of climate engagement and the factors involved in their relative efficacy.
5. Summarize the relevance of psychological and emotional processes to climate change.
6. Identify ways to improve the efficacy of climate engagement through the use of group processes.

Course References:
1. Davenport, L (2017). Emotional resiliency in the era of climate change. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 
2. Jordan, M. (2009). Nature and self—an ambivalent attachment? Ecopsychology, 1, 26–31.
3. Lertzman, R. (2015). Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic dimensions of engagement. Abingdon: Routledge.
4. Hoggett, P. (Ed.) (2019). Climate psychology: on indifference to disaster. London: Palgrave Macmillan 
5. White, B. (2015) States of Emergency: Trauma and Climate Change; Ecopsychology; Dec 2015,192-197.

Workshop 22. Our Diversities/Ourselves: The Impact of our Diverse Cultural Identities on our Work with Groups

Instructor:
Marti Kranzberg, PhD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA,
Clinical Faculty, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, California

We are all influenced by a variety of cultural factors that inform how we experience ourselves & are experienced by others  How we view the world & interaction with others inevitably impact our work in group. In this workshop, participants will explore their own cultural identities & share how these impact their work as group therapists.

Learning Objectives:

The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify & describe cultural identities.
2. Describe experience of listening fully to others'  narratives.
3.  Identify how identities impact work as group therapists.

Course References:
1. Adams, D.M. (2015). The unbearable lightness of being white . Women & Therapy, 38 (3-4) 327-340. http://dx.doi.org.fgul.idm. oclc.org/10.1080/02703149.2015.1059215 
2.Case, K.A. (2015). White Practitioners inTherapeutic Ally Ance: An lntersectional Privilege Awareness Training Model. Women & Therapy, 38 (3-4) 263-278. DOI link: https://doi.org/10.1080/02703149.2015.1059209 Published: 2015-10.02 
3. Nettles, R. (2012). Multiple minority identities in group psychotherapy: Within and Between. In Nettles, R., and Balter, R. (2012). Multiple minority identities: Applications for practice, research, and training. NewYork, NY: Springer Publishing Company 
4. Parent, M.C., Deblaere, C., & Moradi, B. (2013). Approaches to . research on intersectionality: Perspectives on gender, LGBT, and Racial/Ethnic identities. Sex Roles, 68(11-12), 639-645. doi:http://dx.doi.org.fgul.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/sl 1199-013-0283-2 
5. Sue, D.W. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (5th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Workshop 23. Non-Verbal Communication in Groups:  Using Concepts of Polyvagal Theory and Interpersonal Neurobiology When Conducting Online Groups

Instructor:
Lorraine Wodiska, PhD, ABPP, CGP, FAGPA,
Private Practice, Arlington, Virginia

This year, many, if not all of us, have conducted therapy groups online.  There is a layered challenge to working with nonverbal communication when conducting groups in this new venue.   This workshop will offer information about ways to work with the affective information about self and others in our new therapeutic venue using screen technology rather than in-person groups.  I will add concepts from the Polyvagal Theory, Interpersonal Neurobiology and Canine-Assisted Therapy in the material presented.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Offer a general definition of nonverbal communication.
2. List four types of body language seen in an online group. 
3. Name what is missing in nonverbal communication when conducting online group psychotherapy.
4. Describe how animals assist us in understanding nonverbal communication.
5. Educate group members about how to use nonverbal communication when conducting online group therapy.

Course References:
1. (November 1, 2019).  What is your client’s body language telling you? Good Therapy. https://www.goodtherapy.org/for-professionals/marketing/customer-experience/article/what-is-your-clients-body-language-telling-you
2. Badenoch, B. (2008). Being a Brain-wise Therapist:  A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology.  New York:  W. W. Norton & Company. 
3. Dana, D. (2018). The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy:  Engaging the Rhythm of Regulation.  New York:  W. W. Norton & Company. 
4. Mehrabian, A. (1972, 2017). Nonverbal Communication. New York: Routledge.
5. Weinberg, H. & Rolnick, A., (Eds.) (2020). Theory and practice of online therapy:  Internet-delivered Interventions for Individuals, Groups, Families, and Organizations. New York: Routledge.

Workshop 24. Compassion Focused Therapy Groups: How to Help Clients Connect with Compassion

Presented under the auspices of the College Counseling and Other Educational Settings SIG

Instructors:

Mark Beecher, PhD, ABPP, CGP, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Gary Burlingame, PhD, CGP, DFAGPA, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Michael Buxton, PhD, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Hiu Wai Yoko Caldwell, PhD, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Kara Cattani, PhD, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Derek Griner, PhD, ABPP, CGP, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Kristina Hansen, PhD, CGP, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah
Klint Hobbs, PhD, Brigham Young University Counseling and Psychological Services, Provo, Utah

In our workshop, we will provide participants with a basic overview of CFT, its core components, and ways to implement this form of therapy in a group setting. Our workshop will be largely experiential and will demonstrate a variety of group interventions aimed at increasing compassion toward oneself and others and receiving compassion from others.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Describe the three flows of compassion (toward self, toward others, from others).
2. Explain the concept of the tricky brain and the three emotion systems (drive, threat, soothing).
3. Identify ways to regulate body systems using soothing rhythm breathing, imagery, and other mindfulness activities. 
4. Practice implementing compassion building exercises commonly used in a CFT group.

Course References:
1. Gale, C., Schröder, T., & Gilbert, P. (2017). ‘Do You Practice What You Preach?’A Qualitative Exploration of Therapists' Personal Practice of Compassion Focused Therapy. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 24(1), 171-185.
2. Gilbert, P. (2009). The compassionate mind. London: Robinson.
3. Gilbert, P., & Choden. (2014). Mindful compassion: How the science of compassion can help you understand your emotions, live in the present, and connect deeply with others. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.
4. Luberto, C. M., Shinday, N., Song, R., Philpotts, L. L., Park, E. R., Fricchione, G. L., & Yeh, G. Y. (2018). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of meditation on empathy, compassion, and prosocial behaviors. Mindfulness, 9(3), 708-724.
5. Sommers-Spijkerman, M. P. J., Trompetter, H. R., Schreurs, K. M. G., & Bohlmeijer, E. T. (2018). Compassion-focused therapy as guided self-help for enhancing public mental health: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(2), 101.
6. Jensen, J., Cattani, K & Burlingame, G. (2020, under review). Compassion focused group therapy in a university counseling center: An open trial. Psychotherapy Research.

Workshop 25. Enhancing Psychoeducational Groups

Instructor:

Nina Brown, Ed.D, LPC, NCC, DLFAGPA

Psychoeducational groups are used in many settings, for a variety of conditions, and for numerous target audiences.  The workshop presents the basics for creating a group and for enhancing the group experience.  Participants will have opportunities to discuss their experiences with these groups, the concerns and problems and learn the basics for planning effective and successful psychoeducational groups.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Define and describe psychoeducational groups and how these differ from clinical groups.
2. List the major components for planning a psychoeducational group.
3. Identify major concerns and problems encountered by leaders of psychoeducational groups.

Course References:
1. Brown, N. (2019). Psychoeducational Groups (4th ed.). Routledge: NY.
2. Conn, V. Hafdahl, A., Brown, S., & Brown, L. (2007). Meta-analysis of patient education interventions to increase physical activity among chronically ill adults. Patient Education Counseling, 70, 2, 157 - 172
3. Fristad, M. Goldberg-Arnold, J., Gavazzi, S. (2009). Multi-family psychoeducation groups in the treatment of children with mood disorders. Journal of marital and family therapy. 29 4.
4. Sibtz, I. Amering, M., Gossler, R, Unger, A., & Katschniz, H. (2007). Patients' perspectives on what works in psychoeduational groups for schizophrenia. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology. 42, 909 - 915.
5. Smith, T., Sells, S., Rodman, J., & Reynolds, L. (2006). Reducing adolescent substance abuse and delinquency: Pilot research of a family-oriented psychoeducation curriculum. Journal of child and adolescent substance abuse. 15, 4, 105-115.

Workshop 26. Who's Feeling Is It Anyway?  Working with Induction from a Modern Analytic Frame

Instructors:
Heather Frank, PsyD, CGP,
Private Practice, Chicago, Illinois
James O’Hern, LCSW, CGP, Private Practice, Portland, Oregon

This workshop is designed to help therapists identify induced feelings while developing emotional insulation. Topics covered include emotional insulation, transference and countertransference, subjective and objective feelings, and knowing how a therapist's history influences the way they lead group. This workshop will utilize didactic and experiential learning to help participants increase awareness of the range of feelings that can be induced during group and how a group leader can use such feelings to enhance their understanding about group dynamics.

Learning Objectives
The attendee will be able to:
1. Define induced feelings.
2. Identify and utilize the observing ego to distinguish between historical and present feelings.
3. Formulate interventions based on the leaders understanding of induced feelings.
4. Differentiate objective from subjective feelings.
5. Identify emotions that participants may unconsciously discourage in their groups

Course References:
1. Geitner, P. (2012). Emotional communication: Counter transference analysis and the use of feeling and psychoanalytic technique. New York: Routledge.
2. Levine, R. (2017). A modern analytic approach to group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67 (sup 1), S109-S120. 
3. Levine, R. (2011). Progressing while regressing in relationships. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 61(4). 
4. Price, J. (2018). Into the wild: working with preverbal experiences in a group. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68:1, 1-16.
5. Zeisel, E.M. (2017). The leader’s use of self: A modern analytic approach to working in the intrapsychic and interpersonal realm.  Modern Psychoanalysis, 37(2), 43-58.

Workshop 27. Integrative Group Therapy for Patients with Psychosis: An Evidence-Based Approach

Instructor:

Nick Kanas, MD, CGP-R, FAGPA, Professor Emeritus (Psychiatry), University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

This workshop will consider strategies of treating schizophrenic, bipolar, and other psychotic patients in group therapy using the leader's empirically-derived integrative model. The integrative model includes psychodynamic, interpersonal, psychoeducative, and cognitive-behavioral techniques. A literature review, findings from the leader's research, and descriptions of clinical vignettes and demonstrations will be utilized. Participants will be encouraged to share experiences from their own clinical settings.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1.  Discuss the effectiveness of group therapy for patients with psychosis.
2.  Describe clinical strategies for leading groups for patients with psychosis.
3.  Explain how to apply groups for patients with psychosis in the learner's own treatment setting.

Course References:
1. Kanas, N. (2021). Integrative Group Therapy for Psychosis: An Evidence-based Approach. New York: Routledge.  (follow-up book to: Kanas, N. (1996). Group Therapy for Schizophrenic Patients. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.
2. Urlic, I., & Gonzalez de Chavez, M. (2019). Group Therapy for Psychoses. New York: Routledge.
3. Orfanos, S., Banks, C. & Priebe, S.  (2015).  Are group psychotherapeutic treatments effective for patients with schizophrenia?  A systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 84, 241-249.
4. Burlingame, G., Strauss, B., & Joyce, A (2013). Change mechanisms and effectiveness of small group treatments, In M. J. Lambert (Ed.), Bergin & Garfield’s Handbook of Psychotherapy and Behavior Change, 6th Ed. New York: Wiley & Sons. (pp. 640-689)
5. Pearson, M.J., & Burlingame, G.M. (2013). Interventions for schizophrenia: Integrative approaches to group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 63, 603-608.

Workshop 28. The Gratitude of Loss: Utilizing the Stages of Grief as a Strategy for Sustainable Sobriety

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Addiction & Recovery SIG

Instructor:
Andrew Susskind, LCSW, SEP, CGP,
Private Practice, Santa Monica, California

As a psychotherapist whose been in twelve-step recovery for more than twenty-five years, I've witnessed thousands of clients, colleagues and friends struggle with addictive, compulsive behaviors and its consequences. It's been five decades since Elisabeth Kubler-Ross introduced the five stages of loss, but how do you apply them with your clients in addiction recovery today? In this workshop, you'll see how this age-old theory relates to addictive, compulsive behaviors and how grief, gratitude and self-compassion work together toward sustainable sobriety. A demonstration group will be part of this workshop to illustrate how gratitude and loss may be integrated into the group process.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. List the 5 stages of loss related to out-of-control compulsive or addictive behavior.
2. Describe 3 strategies to practice gratitude.
3. Explain the therapeutic benefits of grief recovery as it relates to long-term addiction recovery.

Course References:
1. Emmons, R., & Stern, R. (2013). Gratitude as a Psychotherapeutic Intervention. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69 (8) 846-855.
2. Hamilton, I. (2016). Understanding grief and bereavement. British Journal of General Practice, 66 (651): 523.
3. Kubler-Ross, E. (1969). On Death and Dying: What the Dying Have to Teach Doctors, Nurses, Clergy and Their Own Families. New York: Scribner.
4. Lyubomirsky, S. (2008). The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want. New York: Penguin, revised edition.
5. Seligman, M. (2012). Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being. Atria Books: New York, reprint edition.
6. Susskind, A. (2019). It's Not About the Sex: Moving from Isolation to Intimacy after Sexual Addiction. Las Vegas, NV: Central Recovery Press.
7. Valentine C., Bauld, L., & Walter, T. (2016). Bereavement Following Substance Misuse: A Disenfranchised Grief. Omega Journal of Death and Dying. https://doi.org/10.1177/0030222815625174

Workshop 29. Expanding Diversity Dialogues: Treating Clients with Health Conditions and Disabilities

Presented under the auspices of the AGPA Health and Medical Issues SIG, the College Counseling and Other Educational SIG, the Issues of Aging SIG, and the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Taskforce

Instructors:
Wendy Freedman, PhD, CGP,
Director of Counseling Service, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York
Leslie Klein, PhD, Private Practice, Vienna, Virginia & Long Beach, California
Katheryne Kopp Miller, PsyD, HSPP, Private Practice, Bloomington, Indiana

Individuals with disabilities and health conditions comprise the largest and most diverse minority group in the United States.  All groups likely have a facilitator or member(s) with these experiences. In this workshop, we frame disability through a multicultural lens and demonstrate affirming group work with this population.  Attendees will explore the role of health issues and disability in their professional and personal lives.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Explain how to conceptualize disability and health status as multicultural experiences. 
2.  List common psychological struggles of individuals with disabilities or health conditions.
3. Identify common microaggressions directed toward people with disabilities and health conditions.
4. Name culturally-affirmative accommodations to make when working with clients with disabilities and health conditions.
5. Describe how to develop effective protocols for running therapy groups for clients with disabilities and health conditions.

Course References:
1. Clemency Cordes, C., Cameron, R.P., Mona, L.R., Syme, M.L., 7 Coble-Temple, A. (2016).  Perspectives on disability within integrated healthcare.  In Suzuki, M. Casas, C. Alexander, & M. Jackson (Eds.), Handbook of multicultural counseling (4th ed., pp.401-410). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
2. Freedman, W., Klein, L., & Kopp-Miller, K.  (2020). Chronic health conditions/ability issues in group.  In M. D. Ribeiro (ed.) Examining Social Identities and Diversity Issues in Group Therapy:  Knocking at the Boundaries (pp. 53-65).  New York:  Routledge Press.  
3. Keller, R.M., & Galgay, C.E. (2010).  Microaggressive experiences of people with disabilities. In D.W. Sue (Ed.), Microaggressions and marginality: manifestation, dynamics, and impact (pp. 241-267).  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.  
4. Nettles, R., & Balter, R.(2012). Multiple minority identities. New York, NY. Springer Publishing Company.
 5. Olkin, R., (2017).  Disability-Affirmative Therapy: A case formulation template for clients with disabilities. Oxford University Press

Workshop 30. Developmental Trauma and the Somatic Self Meets Dysregulated Eating

Instructor:
Fran Weiss, LCSW-R, BCD, DCSW, CGP,
Associate Clinical Professor, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York

Making sense of dysregulated eating through the lens of attachment trauma, neurobiology and the somatics.  This workshop will provide cutting edge knowledge to work with those with “weighty problems”.  Overeating – to cope, to fill the void, to deaden self awareness. Integrating somatics wth experiential skills to re-connect with the self.

Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Identify current thinking in the weight regulation field.
2. Describe the metaphor of food through the lens of attachment
3. Explain the scientific question and understanding of the term "food addiction" a la the Yale study vs. the popular belief of "food addiction"
4. Apply somatic work with experiential skills to your group repertoire
5. Create group strategies for affect regulation and working the "window of tolerance"

Course References:
1. Siegel, D.J. (1999). The developing mind: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are (First edition). New York: Guilford
2. Siegel, D.J., & Bryson, T.P. (2020). The Power of Showing Up. Ballantine Books.
3. Holmes, J. (2001). The search for the secure base: Attachment theory and psychotherapy. London: Rutledge
4. Schore, A.N. (1994). Affect regulation and the origin of the self. The neurobiology of emotional development. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Psychodynamics Group Psychotherapy for the Obese Disordered-Eating Adult: A Contemporary View. 
5. Weiss, F. (2018).  American Journal of Psychotherapy.  Implications of Attachment theory and Neuroscience for the Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Obesity and Overeating. 

Large Group Open Session
(5:30 pm-6:45 pm-Eastern)

LG-1: The Large Group 

Presented in cooperation with the Systems-Centered Training and Research Institute

Facilitators: 
Susan P. Gantt, PhD, ABPP, CGP, DFAGPA
Frances Carter, MSS, LSW
Ray Haddock, MBChB, MMedSc, FRCPsych
Mike Maher, MA, UKCP

Consultant: 
Robi Friedman, PhD

Using systems-centered’s (SCT) method of functional subgrouping, this large group will explore the emergent system dynamics and conflicts we have as members, subgroups and as a large group-as-a-whole in each phase of system development. Functional subgrouping supports discriminating and integrating differences as the process by which all living human systems survive, develop and transform. Thinking systems facilitates us discovering how our large group functioning is isomorphic with the larger social contexts in which we are nested.

This session is also being held on Friday (5:30-6:45 pm) and Saturday (2:45-5:15 pm)
Attendance at all sessions is encouraged.

 
Learning Objectives:
The attendee will be able to:
1. Apply functional subgrouping in a large group context.
2. Identify how functional subgrouping enables groups to develop by integrating differences rather than splitting and polarizing.
3. Describe the similarities and differences between the inner-person where we feel like ourselves, the inter-person where we are related with others toward a common goal, and the whole-system context and its norms.
4. Differentiate between what the large group is open to in each phase and what it is closed to.
5. Discuss how the large group is nested in the context of the AGPA conference which is nested in the context of AGPA and how the large group functions is isomorphic with its larger context both within AGPA and at all system levels.
6. Differentiate between explaining which reiterates the known and exploring which takes us to the unknown and opens to emergence.
 
Course References:
1. Agazarian, Y.M., & Carter, F. (1993). The large group and systems-centered theory. GROUP: The Journal of the Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society, 17(4), 210-234.
2. Gantt, S.P., & Agazarian, Y.M. (2011). Highlights from ten years of a systems-centered large group: Work in progress. Voices: The Art and Science of Psychotherapy, 47(1), 40-50.
3. Gantt, S.P., & Agazarian, Y.M. (2017). Systems-centered group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 67(sup1), S60-S70. doi: 10.1080/00207284.2016.1218768
4. Gantt, S.P. (2018). Developing groups that change our minds and transform our brains: Systems-centered’s functional subgrouping, its impact on our neurobiology, and its role in each phase of group development.Psychoanalytic Inquiry: Today’s Bridge Between Psychoanalysis and the Group World [Special Issue]. 38(4), 270-284. 
5. O’Neill, R.M., & Mogle, J. (2015). Systems-centered functional subgrouping and large group outcome. GROUP: The Journal of the Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society, 39 (4), 303-317. doi: 10.13186/group.39.4.0303
6. Whitcomb, K.E., O’Neill, R.M., Burlingame, G.M., Mogle, J., Gantt, S.P., Cannon, J.A.N., & Roney, T. (2018). Measuring how systems-centered® members connect with group dynamics: FSQ-2 construct validity.International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68(2), 163-183. doi: 10.1080/00207284.2017.1381024 


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